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New Haven Day Trip: More Than Just Yale

New Haven Day Trip: More Than Just Yale

For many, the first association made with New Haven, Conn., is that of Yale University. A two-hour train ride from New York City, New Have is a convenient day trip or weekend getaway.

While Yale definitely dominates the skyline with its arresting neo-Gothic architecture, there is plenty to see and do in New Haven.

Where to stay: The Study at Yale is a boutique hotel in the heart of the city just five minutes on foot from the famed university. Perhaps best known as the home of James Franco during his years at Yale, it embraces the academic atmosphere of the city with panache. The lobby itself is designed to be a reading lounge, with books lining the walls and comfortable arm chairs and sofas that one could spend hours in browsing through wide array of subjects on display. The hotel houses Heirloom restaurant, arguably one of the best and coziest restaurants in the city. Its décor includes a wall of wine bottles and an equally impressive wine list paired with its no-frills American fare like warm ricotta, heirloom Connecticut grass-fed burger, and hot caramel apple donuts.

What to eat: With so many college students in town, New Havenites are proud of their pizza, but there are other options, too, ranging from pizza to sushi to Mexican.

For Roman-style pizza, head to Bar, a lounge and beer brewery that serves artisanal pizzas and beers. Try the mashed potato and bacon pizza with a house-brewed lager.

Miya’s Sushi claims to be the first sustainable sushi restaurant in the U.S. Owner Bun Lai supplies this restaurant with local, sustainable seafood from his own fishing grounds in Thimble Islands, Conn. The curiously named Chinese Pygmy Rodeo, a roll of perfectly baked potato topped with Havarti and dill sauce is a must-try.

Beloved Claire’s Corner Copia, a popular joint for locals as well as students, has been around for 38 years. The Lithuanian coffeecake is simple but great for breakfast or after lunch, though you’ll have to get in line, as there are queues that run around the corner at lunchtime.

James Beard honoree chef Prasad Chirnomula spent a few months in the Oaxacan region of Mexico, which inspired him to open Oaxaca, the only Oaxacan restaurant in New Haven. His other restaurant in New Haven is Thali, an Indian restaurant, and it's also worth a visit.

Things to do: As clichéd as it does sound, a tour of Yale’s campus to view its varying architectural forms — Neo-Gothic, Georgian, and post-modern — is unavoidable. The walk takes you through the iconic library that was built as a cathedral, replete with stained glass and an altar area that houses the checkout counter, and its Beinecke Rare Books Library has a copy of Gutenberg Bible.

Many Broadway plays have been tested here before moving to New York’s Great White Way. The Shubert Theater, which celebrates its 100th anniversary in 2014, was the testing ground for musicals such as My Fair Lady and Oklahoma, and where noted actors like Marlon Brando and Meryl Streep have graced the stage. Don’t miss the Yale Repertory Theater, with its wide genre of productions.

New Haven also boasts several museums worth a tour, like the Yale University Art Gallery. Founded in 1832, it houses ancient, medieval, and Renaissance art; Near and Far Eastern art; archaeological material from the University’s excavations; Pre-Columbian and African art; works of European and American masters from virtually every period; and a rich collection of modern art. Admission to this museum and most others in New Haven is free, which means you’ll have extra money to splurge on your supper.

Asha Pagdiwalla, the founder of Fork Spoon Knife, is a Contributor at The Daily Meal.


Art and Architecture in Connecticut!

I've been itching to go on a trip, but I haven't been able to manage yet. So instead, I took a short day trip to. Connecticut! I took Metro North to New Canaan to see Philip Johnson's iconic modernist Glass House.

To my surprise, it doesn't seem like anyone on Fodor's has written about it yet (nothing came up from a web search). So I figured that I'll post about it here just in case someone is interested in it.

Afterwards, I decided on the spur of the moment to visit Yale. I've been to Yale before, but I went specifically to see the Louis Kahn musuems and the Paul Rudolph architecture building.

And it turned out to be a great day!

NYC-New Canaan r/t off-peak: $18.50, about 75 minutes (change at Stamford)
Stamford-New Haven r/t off-peak: $12.50 less than 1 hour

NYC-New Haven r/t off-peak would have been $28, and that takes less than 2 hours.

Built in 1949, this is one of the most iconic modernist houses. Philip Johnson donated it to the National Trust and spent most of his later years there until he died. The Trust opened the House to the public in 2007.

There are two kinds of tours. I opted for the shorter 90-minute tour during which photography is supposedly not permitted. The longer 2-hour tour allows photography and encourages lingering. I asked the guide if the tour visits the same places, and she said yes.

Since the train was more or less hourly, I arrived way too early with plenty of time to browse in the Visitor Center and watch some of the video loops. What I found most interesting were two on the connections of Philip Johnson and David Whitney. One loop featured Johnson's rolodex with a star-studded list of names (name any famous artist and he/she was probably in his rolodex). The other video loop featured postcards sent to David Whitney, Johnson's long-time companion, who died just a few months after he did. Among the postcards were quite a few sent by Andy Warhol. Whitney, by the way, has no connection to the Whitney family who founded the museum. He was also more than 30 years younger than Johnson, who died when he was, I think, 99.

When the time came, we all got onto the van (13 seats for visitors) and went to the Glass House. Tours were sold out way in advance (though I bought mine just a few days ahead of time. When I was chatting with the guide later, she said that one couple had bought their tickets long before their baby was born, when the wife didn't even know she was pregnant). You definitely need a ticket to visit. Apparently earlier on the day of our visit, there were French tourists on bicycles trying to get a glimpse of the Glass House.

Also I learned that New Canaan was actually fertile ground for modernist houses, being home to five Harvard-trained architects (commonly called the "New Cannan Five") and one architect trained at Yale. And our guide told us about the stone walls in New England. Apparently stone is very common in that area and so people gather them to build stone walls. They are remnants from the retreat of glaciers.

The Glass House, well, is much more than the Glass House. Johnson started by buying a few acres of land, but by the time he died, the grounds were a sprawling 47 acres. Our guide said that Johnson was very interested in landscaping. Also Johnson was very wealthy at a young age, as his father believed in giving inheritances away early so that the kids could enjoy their life while they could still do so (if all parents could be like this!). Johnson was given some Alcoa stock (a blue-chip aluminum company) and had servants even when he went to Harvard.

At the entrance to the compound are two buildings. One is the Popestead, which was a colonial house bought by Johnson where his mother lived. The other was "Da Monsta," which is Johnson's last building in this compound built in the 1990s. Frank Stella, I think, was consulted on this building, so it is futuristic and looks like a late Stella sculpture (this could be something straight out of "The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari"). We visited Da Monsta at the end of the tour.

Further on, down a gentle slope are two more buildings. One is Johnson's study. Apparently Johnson liked a bit of challenge, so there's no paved or walk path that leads to the study. Instead one needs to cut through glass. The other is Johnson's "playhouse" (I think the material is a fence-type material that came from Frank Gehry).

The Glass House & The Brick House

Everyone has heard of the Glass House, but I've never heard of the Brick House. Yet before one arrives at the Glass House, one first comes across a concrete sculpture commissioned from Donald Judd (I was surprised, as I wasn't aware Judd did any concrete sculptures). The round sculpture with a hole in between is in slight disrepair, and apparently it wasn't cast quite properly as our guide said that the second truck that was supposed to come was delayed, so the concrete had started to set.

To arrive at the Glass House, one takes a path of small pebbles. Johnson designed the Glass House for one person. The living area comprises carefully arranged furniture (including two Barcelona chairs) by Mies. Our guide said that Mies's daybed, now commonly referred to as the Barcelona daybed, was actually not in the Barcelona Pavilion. Instead Mies designed it for Philip Johnson. Within sight is a much faded, classical French painting by (the school of?) Poussin called "Burial of Phocion."

Near one end is the sleeping area with the famous Bauhaus lamp on the bedside. Near the middle of the house was a circular pillar with a built-in fireplace that also cleverly conceals a bathroom.

The "innards" of the Glass House comes from the Brick House, which I think houses a generator. The floor of the Glass House, I think, is heated in the winter time. Supposedly the Glass House is extremely warm in that period.

The Brick House is also a guesthouse and the decor is less severe and more luxurious (our guide showed us a picture that shows Andy Warhol sleeping in a guestroom). We didn't get a chance to visit the Brick House, however. The Brick House has no windows on the side facing the Glass House, but it has a few round windows (like the ones you see on cruise ships) on the other side.

The Glass House also overlooks another slope, at the bottom of which are a pond and a small pavilion with very low ceilings. Again we just admired the architecture from a distance and we didn't go there.

Philip Johnson and David Whitney were avid art collectors (David Whitney went to Rhode Island School of Design and I think he was an art dealer at one point). Philip Johnson built an art gallery to house (a small!) part of his collection. The gallery has 48 (I think) rotating panels (sort of like the ones used to hang posters or, I guess, carpets) in a giant rolodex of sorts. On display were four works by Frank Stella, two by Rauschenberg and two by Julian Schnabel. (Bear in mind Johnson donated about 2000 works in MoMA, including the Jasper Johns "Flag.")

The Stellas were instantly recognizable, but none of those was an early Black Painting that made Stella a household name. I didn't recognize the Schnabels. To me, Schnabel doesn't seem terribly fashionable these days.

The light fixtures in the bathroom, I think, are by Walter Gropius, who taught at Harvard when Philip Johnson was a student there.

On the side walls of the entry foyer were more art works. On one side was a work by Michael Heizer. On the other side are three instantly recognizable large, square, black and white photos by Lynn Davis, who collaborated with Johnson on a book.

For the art gallery, Johnson used leftovers from the construction of an NYU Library (I think the reddish material must be from the Bobst Library). For the entrance, he paid homage to classical Greece and designed it after the famous structures in Mycenae (I think after the Treasury of Atreus, in this case).

A path and a slightly wobbly bridge (our guide admonished us to cross single file) leads to the sculpture gallery. But before the sculpture gallery was a sculpture by Julian Schnabel that looks like a gigantic tree trunk. Schnabel created the sculpture by casting the finished wood version in bronze.

The sculpture gallery paid homage to Greece again, in a way, with white-washed walls. On view was another Frank Stella and another Rauschenberg. We had to stay on the top level and were basically kept away from close view from all the sculptures, but the bottom level featured some sculptures by Robert Morris. There was one work by Bruce Nauman (with neon flexible light tubes). And to my surprise, there was a work by George Segal that features a couple on a bed.

So it was a great visit, but the weather was cooler than I expected (the compound was very well shaded). But it wasn't an earth shattering experience.

And it'd be nice to have the money to live like this!

After my visit I went to Rosie's to have a lobster roll (lots of lobster) and then I decided to visit Yale on the spur of the moment.

Pleasant surprises at Yale. coming up!

I checked out the link on Wikipedia and there's a very nice link to a document for the nomination of the Glass House as a National Historic Landmark.

p. 11 of this document under "Significance of the Glass House."

"[T]he Glass House remains the epitome of modernism, its simplicity and purity of form unparalleled in domestic architecture."

The entire estate is described very nicely in this document too (much better than my description of it). I guess that's the difference between a professionally written document compared to something whipped up by me in an hour.

Ok, in case anyone really cares about the art at Yale!

After I was finished with the Glass House and lunch, I pondered what I'd do next. I could return to the city or do something more interesting. How about going to Yale, I thought? The weather was nice, and I was halfway there, more or less. I've been to New Haven before, of course, and I know people who went to Yale. But I've never really seen the campus. And it's hard to forget the memorable and moving portrait of the architect Louis Kahn by his son Nathaniel Kahn in the documentary "My Architect," which features a number of Kahn's famous works. I remember some of them and Yale's Gallery of Art. (As it turns out, the Center for British Art was also designed by Louis Kahn.)

So there's architecture to explore in Yale. Now what about the cost? Having experimented with the ticket machine, I found out that I could buy tickets to New Haven, which, when added to my tickets for New Canaan, would cost me just $3 more if I had only gone to New Haven. So that seemed like a deal.

But since I hadn't done any planning, I sent a friend a text message and had another friend verify for me that the galleries would close at 5 (not at 4, say, which would not give me enough time). My friend sent me a text back regarding what to do at Yale: "Darwin exhibit at Brit art museum? [This turned out to be closed.] Frank pepes pizza. Beinicke and sterling libaries. Have fun!"

I know that New Haven is not exactly a pretty town, and the woman who answered the information line asked me to take a cab from the train station. But it's really just a brisk 20-minute walk from campus, as I discovered when I walked to the station from campus on the return trip.

More about the architecture later, but first the art.

Yale University Art Gallery

I was amazed by how varied the collection was. There's a bit of everything, but I focused on Western Art. On the ground floor was an exhibition on problems with restoration and reformation. As an example, there a sculpture by Antoine (?) Pevsner was sadly disintegrating, as he used unstable material in its construction. I've never heard of this sculptor, who was apparently a constructivist (whatever this means, but this conjures Malevich).

I went to the third floor, which is encyclopedic in its scope. Where to start? How about the Impressionists? Two of the most important paintings in this part of the collection, in my view, were both donated by Stephen Clark. One is van Gogh's "Night Cafe," which evidently is the subject of an ownership dispute lawsuit at the moment (you'll discover this when you look for this painting online). The other is a painting by Manet of a woman dressed in bullfighter's clothing, after one of Goya's majas. Manet had challenged art tradition before, and there he was at it again.

Not long ago, the Met organized an exhibition on paintings that belonged to the Clark brothers, who suffered an irreparable rupture in their relationship. I can't recall if Yale sent these two paintings.

The collection of Italian Renaissance paintings was interesting also. Apparently Yale has the "only painting by Pollaiuolo in the Western Hemisphere, Hercules and Deinaira." The claim seems dubious, but maybe other paintings were jointly painted by the brothers. There were also two small but exquisite fragments featuring the Annunciation by Fra Angelico, which are apparently related to fragments at the Getty Museum.

Then I'd forgotten all about the Bosch at Yale! Yale claims that their "Allegory of Intemperance" and the Bosch at Louvre were part of one side of a triptych. The other part belongs to the National Gallery in DC (if I remember right). The middle panel is now missing.

The more modern art in this collection was interesting also. I saw Duchamp's "Tu m' " that was shown in the Dada exhibition in DC and NYC a while ago. I'll just run through a small list of names: Gerhard Richter, Andy Warhol, Matthew Barney, and even a proto-drip painting by Jackson Pollock c. 1948. What I found was the most striking, however, was a very lifelike sculpture of a drug addict by Duane Hanson. When I saw that from a distance, I was wondering why a student was lying on the floor like that.

And it's worthwhile mentioning Edward Austin Abbey's painting of the play scene in "Hamlet." I've never heard of this painter, but the style is reminiscent of symbolists such as Redon and Knopff. The painting was quite stunning.

Finally, the sculpture courtyard and the sculpture garden. This is perhaps a little confusing. The garden, I think, is the space on the ground floor, and the courtyard is on the lower level. Currently the courtyard featured a work by Richard Serra (who went to Yale). I saw works by David Smith, Tony Smith, Louise Nevelson in the garden. There was a work by Martin Puryear called Le Prix, who went to Yale also.

Link to the Bosch (famous for "Garden of Earthly Delights" in Prado):

Center for British Art

Next I headed across the street for the Center for British Art, which turns out to be a Louis Kahn building also. (I didn't know this.) There were two sculptures by Barbara Hepworth near the entrance.

I didn't spend much time here because I know very little about British art, but I did go through the exhibition on paintings from the Royal Halloway collection. Halloway was a very wealthy man who endowed a college (now in University of London) and gave them a paintings collection. One interesting work was a painting by Landseer called "Man Proposes, God Disposes." (1864) "The work depicts polar bears devouring the remains of Sir John Franklin's doomed expedition, begun in 1845, to discover the Northwest Passage. Even today, it inspires superstition among Royal Holloway's students, and as a result the painting is concealed during College examinations."

I'll just leave you to read the rest on the museum's website.

Link: "Paintings from the Reign of Victoria. "

Next: Louis Kahn Or maybe not. Actually I don't know much about him beyond what I remember from that documentary. I should read a little about the Yale buildings.


Strike a Pose with The Thing. The Marvel Universe Comes to Life.

Image

“Avengers” superfans! The only East Coast stop for the immersive exhibit, Marvel: Universe of Super Heroes, is in Philadelphia through September 2. Original, hand-drawn images of Spider-Man and Black Panther, a disorienting Doctor Strange-themed mirror room, costumes worn by Chris Hemsworth as Thor and Chris Evans as Captain America and selfie opportunities with The Thing and The Incredible Hulk, are among the 300 or so artifacts showcased at the Franklin Institute, a 20-minute walk from the 30th Street train station.

Other attractions in the Eastern Seaboard’s second largest city can be handily visited on foot, by bike or mass transit. For killer, hand-hacked lamb tucked in handmade tortillas, head to South Philly Barbacoa (1140 S. Ninth St.), which moved to a corner spot in the Italian Market last year and is open Saturday to Monday. From there, walk 13 minutes to Philadelphia’s Magic Gardens (1020 South St.), a mind-bending, indoor/outdoor maze of mosaics created by the Philadelphia-based artist Isaiah Zagar. Hand-painted tiles, broken plates, bottles, dolls, bicycle wheels and folk art statues create a flowing canvas that evokes a pantheon of influences, including Robert Rauschenberg and Jasper Johns. Now venture north to Northern Liberties and Fishtown, cool neighborhoods alive with street art and indie shops. Your trip should involve one last thing: Suraya (1528 Frankford Ave.). The Lebanese restaurant has won local and national accolades for its mezze, like za’atar-scented labneh, smoky baba ganoush and fried kibbe sweetened with raisins. The modern, open space has a long bar as well as outdoor seating in a beautiful, tree-filled garden.

New Jersey Transit trains run regularly, a journey of less than three hours, departing from Pennsylvania Station. (Amtrak is faster but generally more expensive cheaper options include Bolt Bus and Greyhound). Round-trip, off-peak fare: $33.50, plus $18.50 round-trip on a SEPTA train, transferring at Trenton Transit Center, for a total of $52.


Psilocybin therapy 4 times more effective than antidepressants, study finds

Is there a way for one to apply to be a subject of these trials? I bet that it's neither easy nor cheap. Those stats are promising.

It doesn't (usually) cost money to be in scientific trials. In large medical trials subjects are sometimes compensated for participating. The hard part of signing up is you gotta be in the same city as the researchers

yes i know anecdotal but i used it for years to deal with my depression, i stopped when i entered the medical field, ended up taking anti depressants, just for safeties sake im going to have to stick with them until it becomes legal in my state, but i much prefered shrooms, i only had to take them once every few months. Taking pills every day sucks, and you feel like crap if you forget to take one.

Find an academic center. They'll pay you to participate.

Source: ran many clinical trials.

Take a few therapy sessions, trip, more therapy, trip again, more therapy. Be your own trial. Or just eat some and have fun. Whatever you need.

I've been microdosing for 6 weeks. I was in a major depressive episode, partially due to a shitty world and hurricanes, but also partially self inflicted with MDMA. Within 2 weeks, I felt much better. 6 weeks, and I haven't felt better in years. It's worth checking out r/microdosing

It's probably going to be pretty cheap

Grow in fish tank in closet

Take and then spend time meditating

That's all you need. These studies are just confirming what hippies have known for decades

Just started growing shrooms at home. It's cheap and spores are legal

Until now, I'm pretty sure you had to have terminal cancer to participate. Now, you just move to Oregon.

Apply. I’m in the COVID vaccine trial, and I get paid

Psilocybin is incredibly cheap (

half the price of marijuana per weight) and you need much less per dose. Depending on the source it’s around $5-10 per gram. Some places you can find them in the wild but it takes being able to decipher it is the mush you are looking for.

This study and many others like it are getting these results by combining mild psilocybin doses with psychotherapy. In other words they give you a non-hallucinogenic dose then do psychotherapy with a registered therapist (this is the expensive part). Of course they won’t let you bring your own baggie because they want to be sure of the dose obviously.


The following problems are organized into four distinct types of problems dealing with ratio and proportion calculations. The first type of problems will be standard problems that deal with understanding ratios and proportions as equivalent fractions. The second type of problems will be compound ratios which will involve calculating several ratios in succession. The third type will involve doing addition or subtraction in order to find a number for computing a ratio which will be called computational ratios. Finally, there will be a few problems that are complex ratios, which will involve developing some complex relationship between proportions. One reason for organizing the problems in this way is to illustrate an orderly progression in complexity, while underscoring similarity of structure. Of course, there are more problems in the first category than there are in subsequent categories. These will serve as a basis to help the students become familiar with and later recognize structure and format.

Standard Ratio Problems

1. “Bobby has a bag full of marbles that he keeps in his room. He has 35 red marbles and 25 green marbles. Find the ratio of red marbles to green marbles, and put it in its simplest form.”

This is a relatively simple ratio word problem that includes the slight wrinkle of including the aspect of fractions that students seem to universally dislike - simplest form. It begins with the relatively harmless ratio of 35/25. The difficulty in this problem is such that there are fraction processes that will be involved like greatest common factor, factoring, and/or the rules of divisibility. Students should have a familiarity with these processes before tackling this type of problem, but even if they do not there is much that they can do with this problem.

Not all students will immediately note that the number five is a common factor in both the numerator and the denominator. In fact most of my students would insist on factoring both the numerator and the denominator to make certain that five is the greatest common factor.

However the students choose to get the result does not really matter, what does matter is that students should have various means for finding simplest form, eventually, dividing the denominator and the numerator by five in order to get: simplest form. Here’s another.

2. “To make 20 biscuits, Juanita uses 5 cups of flour to 1 cup of milk. If she uses 3 cups of milk, how many cups of flour will she use?

This is another pretty straightforward problem which sets up a proportion pretty nicely. There is an added bonus that some extraneous information is given which lends itself to the asking of a series of follow-up questions.

Some follow-up questions might include, “If we know that 5 cups of flour make 20 biscuits, can we figure out how many biscuits are made with 15 cups of flour?” Most middle school students can figure pretty quickly that 15 cups are 3 times as much as 5 cups which means that they will have to multiply 20 by 3 to get 60. By playing around with word problems in this way, students begin to realize that once you understand the idea of equivalency, they have won half the battle when it comes to proportions.

3. “When 2,000 pounds of paper are recycled or reused, 17 trees are saved. How many trees are saved if 5,000 pounds of paper is recycled? How many trees are saved if 10,000 pounds of paper is recycled?”

This is another standard ratio question that lends itself to being a series of questions, and in fact, I would have my students strategize as to which of the two questions is easier to answer. Some of them might recognize that the second question is an easier question to answer, and that when that question is answered, it will help to resolve the first question.

10,000 is 5 times more than 2,000 therefore x must be 5 times more than 17 or 85.

5,000 is half of 10,000 therefore x must be half of 85 or 42.5.

4. “If it costs $90 to feed a family of 3 for one week, how much will it cost to feed a family of 5 for one week? How much will it cost to feed a family of six, seven, and eight?

The ratio again is pretty easy to set up. $90/3 = $x/5. However, I think that I would have my students approach this problem a little different. I would want them to see that 90 is divisible by three, and that once I know how much it costs to feed each person in the family ($30), then whenever I’m asked how much would it cost to feed y number of people in a particular family, I would only need to multiply y by $30.

More Standard Ratio and Proportion Problems

5. “In a school there are four boy scouts to every three girl scouts. If there are forty-two girl scouts, how many boy scouts are there? If there are 81 girl scouts, how many boy scouts are there?”

6. “To make green paint, a painter mixes yellow paint and blue paint in the ratio of three to two. If he used twelve gallons of yellow paint, how much blue paint did he use?”

7. “A rectangle measures 40 cm at its length and 20 cm at its width. Find the ratio of the length to the width in lowest form.”

8. “When a robin flies, it beats its wings an average of 23 times in ten seconds. How many times will it beat its wings in two minutes?”

9. “Inez is 5’4” tall. At a certain time of day, she measures her shadow, and finds it is 8’ long. She also measures the shadow of a tree which is 40’. How tall is the tree?”

10. “The average human heart beats at 72 beats per minute. How many times does it beat in 15 seconds? How many in an hour? How many in a day? How many in a year? Take your pulse and record the number of beats in 30 seconds. How many times does it beat in an hour? How many times does it beat in a day, a month, a year?”

Compound Ratios

11. “On a triangle, each side measures 5 cm, 10 cm, and 30 cm, respectively. In lowest terms, find the ratios of the lengths of the sides.”

In this word problem, there are three numbers that must be placed in a ratio. That will look like this:

Immediately, it should be noted that the numbers are all divisible by five and that the ratio can better be expressed in its lowest form of 1:2:6.

12. “The church is going on a trip to Niagara Falls via several buses. The ratio of men to women to children is 1:2:3. If there are 120 people going on the trip, how many men are going? How many women are going? How many children are going?”

There are a variety of strategies that can be implemented. One can show that by adding up the initial ratio one can decipher that out of every 6 people, three will be children, two will be women, and one will be a man. Then one can divide 120 by 6 which will show that there are twenty groups of 6 people. Lastly, we multiply by 20 each part of the original ratio. Consequently, 20 men, 40 women, and 60 children went on the trip to Niagara Falls.

13. “Kim mixed seltzer, fruit punch concentrate, and ginger ale in the ratio of 2:2:4 to make a special drink for her friend’s birthday party. To make three gallons, how much of each ingredient should Kim use?”

The complexity of this problem, I believe solely revolves around converting gallons to cups. Generally, I give the students a helpful hint in which I might let them know that they will have to convert gallons to cups and that there are 16 cups in a gallon. Once I have given the students that information, it usually puts them on the right track.

2:2:4 means that out of every 8 cups, two of them are seltzer, two of them are fruit punch concentrate, and four of them are ginger ale. 48/8 = 6. That means that I now multiply each part of the ratio with 6 to ascertain how many cups of each ingredient Kim will need in order to make three gallons of punch. Kim will need 12 cups of seltzer, 12 cups of fruit punch concentrate, and 24 cups of ginger ale.

Computational Ratios and Proportions

Computational ratio and proportion problems are problems that require more than just dividing, applying rules of divisibility, or seeking out equivalent fractions. They require addition, subtraction, multiplication, and/or division. As a consequence, these will require a little more thought and strategizing on the part of students to correctly identify the methods that they will need to figure out these word problems.

14. “A rectangle measures 20cm at its length and 5 cm at its width. Find the ratio of the length to the width to the perimeter of the rectangle in lowest form.”

The uniqueness of this word problem revolves around the fact that in this ratio there will be three numbers in the comparison as well as figuring out perimeter, and the fraction processes of lowest terms. The formula of perimeter requires addition of all sides.

The number five appears to be the common factor. In order to make the ratio in its lowest terms we need to divide all of the numbers by five. The answer will be: 4:1:10.

15. “David received $50 dollars for working at his father’s store. He spent $20 dollars at the movies, and $10 dollars buying comic books. After buying $5 worth of candy, he saved the rest. What is the ratio of the amount of money David spent buying comic books and candy, to the amount that David saved?”

Again we have a ratio problem that looks pretty simple on the face of it, but one might be surprised to find how many students fall into the subtle snare that this word problem involves. There are several amounts of money communicated and some that are not made explicit. For instance, students are told how much money David earned, but they are not told how much money he saved. The problem therefore requires several steps on the part of students. Most students will try to cut as many steps out of the equation in the attempt to make it easier for themselves and as a consequence they will fall easily into the trap.

The key to this word problem is found in the fact that the ratio that is required does not involve all of the money spent. The final sentence only asks for a ratio that involves only the money that David spent buying comic books and candy, not the money he spent at the movies. Many students in order to make the problem easier for them will make the incorrect assumption that they will have to add up all the money David spent. What is all the more interesting is that they do not need to add up all the numbers for the first part of this ratio, but they will need to do it to figure out how much David saved. The mathematical procedures should look something like this

This type of problem will serve to underscore that students will need to really pay attention to all aspects of the problem. On standardized tests word problems tend to have distractors. These multi-step problems will help students develop strategies to weather the multi-step problems found on standardized tests.

16. “78 children attended a trip to Six Flags. 60 of them were boys. Find the ratio of the number of boys to girls, and express the number of boys as a fraction in lowest terms to the number of girls.”

Many of these types of word problems involve a tremendous amount of verbiage that serve to distract and confuse students. As a consequence many students tend to either look for the numbers and then to blindly do some calculation that they hope will net them the answer or they just skip over those problems that have a lot of words. This problem is of the type that most children will want to skip but it is really not a difficult problem that requires much calculation.

78 children on a trip, 60 of them are boys, 18 obviously are girls. The ratio of boys to girls is 60/18. Both numbers are even, therefore a common factor is 2. Divide both numerator and denominator by two. 60/18 = 30/9. I again see that both numbers have a common factor, but this time that common factor is three. 30/9 = 10/3. The answer is that for every ten boys that went on the trip, there are three girls that went on the trip.

More Computational Ratio and Proportion Problems

17. “In the United States there is one car for every 1.7 people. How many car tires (on cars) per person are there?”

18. “One out of three students in the school owns a dog. Of these students one out of two owns a cat. What fraction of the students owns both a cat and a dog?”

Complex Problems Involving Ratios and Proportions

In these problems, there are some complex relationships that need to be discovered. There are few students that I find have the patience to really grasp these problems, however, if the students can get through one or two of these problems, I believe that they will be amply prepared for any standardized test.

19. “There are two sisters named Mary and Sue who need to buy a present for their mother’s birthday. The perfume there mother likes is $50 dollars a bottle. Mary is the older sister and she gets more allowance money than her little sister, so they have decided that Mary will give $3 for every $2 dollars her sister gives. For every $15 Mary (the older sister) gives, how much does the younger sister give?”

In order to work with this problem an initial ratio must be the first thing ascertained. This is clearly elucidated by the statement declaring that Mary gives $3 for every $2 given by Sue. Mathematically it would look something like this:

My students (as well as most middle school students) tend to be creatures of habit and because this is the way they learned and understood ratio, proportion, and percent, upon seeing the problem formatted this way, their minds instantly recall what they learned about proportions and cross multiplication. They become so focused on finding an answer that they hardly recognize the variable as an algebraic entity. After a very short time my students can figure this out easily.

Because my students are bilingual students, I tend to do quite a few word problems as a way of preparing them for the language of standardized tests. My sense is that because students do not do enough word problems in class, when they are confronted by word problems on standardized exams like the CMT, they get “brain lock”, the equivalent of stage fright to an actor. If, somehow we teachers could find creative ways to include word problems in every unit, as well as the usual strictly numerical problems, students would be better prepared for these exams. The answer to this problem is

An added benefit to these word problems is that these problems as stated above can be further complicated by adding a series of follow-up questions to the first question. For instance, how much of the $50 dollars did Sue pay? How much of the $50 dollars did Mary pay? If they had a little brother named Harry who gave them $5 dollars for their mother’s present, how much would each have to put in? These questions make each word problem unique and can be a subject of profound mathematical discussion.

20. “Guillermo drives between Boston to Pittsburgh, a distance of 600 miles. From Boston to Pittsburgh, he averages 50 miles per hour. On the return trip, he averages 60 miles per hour. How long does the trip take?”

Guillermo must drive each way 600 miles. 600/50 = x hours (the trip to Pittsburgh). 600/60 = y hours (the return trip to Boston). Add the number of hours it took to go in both directions (x + y = ? hours). Once the equation is set up, the rest is rather pedantic. 12 hours one way, 10 hours the other way, 22 hours all told. The same problem can be told a couple of ways.

21. “Guillermo drives between Boston to Pittsburgh, a distance of 600 miles. From Boston to Pittsburgh, he averages 50 miles per hour. He is able to go faster on the return trip, and the total trip takes only 22 hours. What was his average speed on the way back?”

22. “Guillermo drives between Boston to Pittsburgh. From Boston to Pittsburgh, he averages 50 miles per hour. On the return trip, he averages 60 miles per hour. His driving time was 22 hours. How far is it from Boston to Pittsburgh?”


15 Jaw-Dropping US Libraries All Bookworms Should Visit This Summer

Whether it’s the intoxicating smell of old books or the millions of stories just waiting to be discovered, take a bookworm to a library and you’ll likely be stuck there for a long time. With thousands and thousands of books to discover — from Pulitzer Prize winners to cheeky little books that inspired rom-coms — a trip to the local library is the best free entertainment in town. But no matter how much you love your city’s library, there’s no greater feeling than exploring an historic building filled with ancient volumes while on vacay. Heck, these 15 stunning libraries across America are so fantastic, you’ll probably want to call up your book club to start planning your cross country literary road trip as soon as you finish scrolling.

1. Morgan Library, NYC: What began as the private collection of financier Pierpont Morgan is now on display to the public, and absolutely breathtaking to behold. From its Italian Renaissance-style palazzo to its rich collection of rare books and manuscripts — including a Bible printed by Johannes Gutenberg in 1455 — there’s no wonder tourists across the globe anxiously await a visit to this breathtaking literary arena. (Photo via @TheMorganLibrary)

2. Billings Public Library, Billings, MT: A public library that serves Billings and Yellowstone County, this book collection was recently moved into a brand new, light-filled, 66,000 square foot building. Grand and geometric in design, this heritage classic is an amazing place to spend a day with bookish friends.


The following problems are organized into four distinct types of problems dealing with ratio and proportion calculations. The first type of problems will be standard problems that deal with understanding ratios and proportions as equivalent fractions. The second type of problems will be compound ratios which will involve calculating several ratios in succession. The third type will involve doing addition or subtraction in order to find a number for computing a ratio which will be called computational ratios. Finally, there will be a few problems that are complex ratios, which will involve developing some complex relationship between proportions. One reason for organizing the problems in this way is to illustrate an orderly progression in complexity, while underscoring similarity of structure. Of course, there are more problems in the first category than there are in subsequent categories. These will serve as a basis to help the students become familiar with and later recognize structure and format.

Standard Ratio Problems

1. “Bobby has a bag full of marbles that he keeps in his room. He has 35 red marbles and 25 green marbles. Find the ratio of red marbles to green marbles, and put it in its simplest form.”

This is a relatively simple ratio word problem that includes the slight wrinkle of including the aspect of fractions that students seem to universally dislike - simplest form. It begins with the relatively harmless ratio of 35/25. The difficulty in this problem is such that there are fraction processes that will be involved like greatest common factor, factoring, and/or the rules of divisibility. Students should have a familiarity with these processes before tackling this type of problem, but even if they do not there is much that they can do with this problem.

Not all students will immediately note that the number five is a common factor in both the numerator and the denominator. In fact most of my students would insist on factoring both the numerator and the denominator to make certain that five is the greatest common factor.

However the students choose to get the result does not really matter, what does matter is that students should have various means for finding simplest form, eventually, dividing the denominator and the numerator by five in order to get: simplest form. Here’s another.

2. “To make 20 biscuits, Juanita uses 5 cups of flour to 1 cup of milk. If she uses 3 cups of milk, how many cups of flour will she use?

This is another pretty straightforward problem which sets up a proportion pretty nicely. There is an added bonus that some extraneous information is given which lends itself to the asking of a series of follow-up questions.

Some follow-up questions might include, “If we know that 5 cups of flour make 20 biscuits, can we figure out how many biscuits are made with 15 cups of flour?” Most middle school students can figure pretty quickly that 15 cups are 3 times as much as 5 cups which means that they will have to multiply 20 by 3 to get 60. By playing around with word problems in this way, students begin to realize that once you understand the idea of equivalency, they have won half the battle when it comes to proportions.

3. “When 2,000 pounds of paper are recycled or reused, 17 trees are saved. How many trees are saved if 5,000 pounds of paper is recycled? How many trees are saved if 10,000 pounds of paper is recycled?”

This is another standard ratio question that lends itself to being a series of questions, and in fact, I would have my students strategize as to which of the two questions is easier to answer. Some of them might recognize that the second question is an easier question to answer, and that when that question is answered, it will help to resolve the first question.

10,000 is 5 times more than 2,000 therefore x must be 5 times more than 17 or 85.

5,000 is half of 10,000 therefore x must be half of 85 or 42.5.

4. “If it costs $90 to feed a family of 3 for one week, how much will it cost to feed a family of 5 for one week? How much will it cost to feed a family of six, seven, and eight?

The ratio again is pretty easy to set up. $90/3 = $x/5. However, I think that I would have my students approach this problem a little different. I would want them to see that 90 is divisible by three, and that once I know how much it costs to feed each person in the family ($30), then whenever I’m asked how much would it cost to feed y number of people in a particular family, I would only need to multiply y by $30.

More Standard Ratio and Proportion Problems

5. “In a school there are four boy scouts to every three girl scouts. If there are forty-two girl scouts, how many boy scouts are there? If there are 81 girl scouts, how many boy scouts are there?”

6. “To make green paint, a painter mixes yellow paint and blue paint in the ratio of three to two. If he used twelve gallons of yellow paint, how much blue paint did he use?”

7. “A rectangle measures 40 cm at its length and 20 cm at its width. Find the ratio of the length to the width in lowest form.”

8. “When a robin flies, it beats its wings an average of 23 times in ten seconds. How many times will it beat its wings in two minutes?”

9. “Inez is 5’4” tall. At a certain time of day, she measures her shadow, and finds it is 8’ long. She also measures the shadow of a tree which is 40’. How tall is the tree?”

10. “The average human heart beats at 72 beats per minute. How many times does it beat in 15 seconds? How many in an hour? How many in a day? How many in a year? Take your pulse and record the number of beats in 30 seconds. How many times does it beat in an hour? How many times does it beat in a day, a month, a year?”

Compound Ratios

11. “On a triangle, each side measures 5 cm, 10 cm, and 30 cm, respectively. In lowest terms, find the ratios of the lengths of the sides.”

In this word problem, there are three numbers that must be placed in a ratio. That will look like this:

Immediately, it should be noted that the numbers are all divisible by five and that the ratio can better be expressed in its lowest form of 1:2:6.

12. “The church is going on a trip to Niagara Falls via several buses. The ratio of men to women to children is 1:2:3. If there are 120 people going on the trip, how many men are going? How many women are going? How many children are going?”

There are a variety of strategies that can be implemented. One can show that by adding up the initial ratio one can decipher that out of every 6 people, three will be children, two will be women, and one will be a man. Then one can divide 120 by 6 which will show that there are twenty groups of 6 people. Lastly, we multiply by 20 each part of the original ratio. Consequently, 20 men, 40 women, and 60 children went on the trip to Niagara Falls.

13. “Kim mixed seltzer, fruit punch concentrate, and ginger ale in the ratio of 2:2:4 to make a special drink for her friend’s birthday party. To make three gallons, how much of each ingredient should Kim use?”

The complexity of this problem, I believe solely revolves around converting gallons to cups. Generally, I give the students a helpful hint in which I might let them know that they will have to convert gallons to cups and that there are 16 cups in a gallon. Once I have given the students that information, it usually puts them on the right track.

2:2:4 means that out of every 8 cups, two of them are seltzer, two of them are fruit punch concentrate, and four of them are ginger ale. 48/8 = 6. That means that I now multiply each part of the ratio with 6 to ascertain how many cups of each ingredient Kim will need in order to make three gallons of punch. Kim will need 12 cups of seltzer, 12 cups of fruit punch concentrate, and 24 cups of ginger ale.

Computational Ratios and Proportions

Computational ratio and proportion problems are problems that require more than just dividing, applying rules of divisibility, or seeking out equivalent fractions. They require addition, subtraction, multiplication, and/or division. As a consequence, these will require a little more thought and strategizing on the part of students to correctly identify the methods that they will need to figure out these word problems.

14. “A rectangle measures 20cm at its length and 5 cm at its width. Find the ratio of the length to the width to the perimeter of the rectangle in lowest form.”

The uniqueness of this word problem revolves around the fact that in this ratio there will be three numbers in the comparison as well as figuring out perimeter, and the fraction processes of lowest terms. The formula of perimeter requires addition of all sides.

The number five appears to be the common factor. In order to make the ratio in its lowest terms we need to divide all of the numbers by five. The answer will be: 4:1:10.

15. “David received $50 dollars for working at his father’s store. He spent $20 dollars at the movies, and $10 dollars buying comic books. After buying $5 worth of candy, he saved the rest. What is the ratio of the amount of money David spent buying comic books and candy, to the amount that David saved?”

Again we have a ratio problem that looks pretty simple on the face of it, but one might be surprised to find how many students fall into the subtle snare that this word problem involves. There are several amounts of money communicated and some that are not made explicit. For instance, students are told how much money David earned, but they are not told how much money he saved. The problem therefore requires several steps on the part of students. Most students will try to cut as many steps out of the equation in the attempt to make it easier for themselves and as a consequence they will fall easily into the trap.

The key to this word problem is found in the fact that the ratio that is required does not involve all of the money spent. The final sentence only asks for a ratio that involves only the money that David spent buying comic books and candy, not the money he spent at the movies. Many students in order to make the problem easier for them will make the incorrect assumption that they will have to add up all the money David spent. What is all the more interesting is that they do not need to add up all the numbers for the first part of this ratio, but they will need to do it to figure out how much David saved. The mathematical procedures should look something like this

This type of problem will serve to underscore that students will need to really pay attention to all aspects of the problem. On standardized tests word problems tend to have distractors. These multi-step problems will help students develop strategies to weather the multi-step problems found on standardized tests.

16. “78 children attended a trip to Six Flags. 60 of them were boys. Find the ratio of the number of boys to girls, and express the number of boys as a fraction in lowest terms to the number of girls.”

Many of these types of word problems involve a tremendous amount of verbiage that serve to distract and confuse students. As a consequence many students tend to either look for the numbers and then to blindly do some calculation that they hope will net them the answer or they just skip over those problems that have a lot of words. This problem is of the type that most children will want to skip but it is really not a difficult problem that requires much calculation.

78 children on a trip, 60 of them are boys, 18 obviously are girls. The ratio of boys to girls is 60/18. Both numbers are even, therefore a common factor is 2. Divide both numerator and denominator by two. 60/18 = 30/9. I again see that both numbers have a common factor, but this time that common factor is three. 30/9 = 10/3. The answer is that for every ten boys that went on the trip, there are three girls that went on the trip.

More Computational Ratio and Proportion Problems

17. “In the United States there is one car for every 1.7 people. How many car tires (on cars) per person are there?”

18. “One out of three students in the school owns a dog. Of these students one out of two owns a cat. What fraction of the students owns both a cat and a dog?”

Complex Problems Involving Ratios and Proportions

In these problems, there are some complex relationships that need to be discovered. There are few students that I find have the patience to really grasp these problems, however, if the students can get through one or two of these problems, I believe that they will be amply prepared for any standardized test.

19. “There are two sisters named Mary and Sue who need to buy a present for their mother’s birthday. The perfume there mother likes is $50 dollars a bottle. Mary is the older sister and she gets more allowance money than her little sister, so they have decided that Mary will give $3 for every $2 dollars her sister gives. For every $15 Mary (the older sister) gives, how much does the younger sister give?”

In order to work with this problem an initial ratio must be the first thing ascertained. This is clearly elucidated by the statement declaring that Mary gives $3 for every $2 given by Sue. Mathematically it would look something like this:

My students (as well as most middle school students) tend to be creatures of habit and because this is the way they learned and understood ratio, proportion, and percent, upon seeing the problem formatted this way, their minds instantly recall what they learned about proportions and cross multiplication. They become so focused on finding an answer that they hardly recognize the variable as an algebraic entity. After a very short time my students can figure this out easily.

Because my students are bilingual students, I tend to do quite a few word problems as a way of preparing them for the language of standardized tests. My sense is that because students do not do enough word problems in class, when they are confronted by word problems on standardized exams like the CMT, they get “brain lock”, the equivalent of stage fright to an actor. If, somehow we teachers could find creative ways to include word problems in every unit, as well as the usual strictly numerical problems, students would be better prepared for these exams. The answer to this problem is

An added benefit to these word problems is that these problems as stated above can be further complicated by adding a series of follow-up questions to the first question. For instance, how much of the $50 dollars did Sue pay? How much of the $50 dollars did Mary pay? If they had a little brother named Harry who gave them $5 dollars for their mother’s present, how much would each have to put in? These questions make each word problem unique and can be a subject of profound mathematical discussion.

20. “Guillermo drives between Boston to Pittsburgh, a distance of 600 miles. From Boston to Pittsburgh, he averages 50 miles per hour. On the return trip, he averages 60 miles per hour. How long does the trip take?”

Guillermo must drive each way 600 miles. 600/50 = x hours (the trip to Pittsburgh). 600/60 = y hours (the return trip to Boston). Add the number of hours it took to go in both directions (x + y = ? hours). Once the equation is set up, the rest is rather pedantic. 12 hours one way, 10 hours the other way, 22 hours all told. The same problem can be told a couple of ways.

21. “Guillermo drives between Boston to Pittsburgh, a distance of 600 miles. From Boston to Pittsburgh, he averages 50 miles per hour. He is able to go faster on the return trip, and the total trip takes only 22 hours. What was his average speed on the way back?”

22. “Guillermo drives between Boston to Pittsburgh. From Boston to Pittsburgh, he averages 50 miles per hour. On the return trip, he averages 60 miles per hour. His driving time was 22 hours. How far is it from Boston to Pittsburgh?”


Are Trains Nearing the End of the Line?

MYSTIC WE are reminded daily of our responsibility to do all we can to conserve energy, but many of us who are residents of southeastern Connecticut and southwestern Rhode Island have been deprived of the opportunity to exercise this responsibility.

Mass transit is, of course, one of our most important energy‐conserving alternatives. During the last few years, increasing numbers of people have elected to travel by rail again. The roadbeds along coastal New England has been improved, new rolling stock has made the trip more comfortable than ever, and members of smaller communities along the shore have. rallied (in large part with their own money and labor) to refurbish long‐neglected stations.

Service to New York was improved dramatically, and it became possible to be in the city by 9:30 A.M., spend a full day, and be back in Old Saybrook, Mystic or even Kingston, R.I., for dinner! Visitors to our historic museums and recreational resources, so important to the area's economy, could spend more time here. Taking the train became popular.

Our local economic well‐being depends on our ability to compete with the larger urban centers. In order to do this, business and industry must have access to their suppliers and customers. This area is New York oriented—commercially, socially and culturally. Some residents and business people commute to New Haven daily others go to New York several times each week. Our ready communication with the city on which we depend for so many things can only be achieved through thoughtful, convenient scheduling of public transportation.

Very suddenly last September (14 people in fact were stranded on the Westerly, R.I., station platform) the early train to New Haven and New York was taken off. In response to the immediate outcry by commuters from Providence to New Haven, service was restored, but not for long. Since the April 30 Amtrack schedule went into effect, residents who rely on service from Kingston, Westerly and Mystic are unable to reach New York before P.M. without great inconvenience.

What alternatives does the energyminded citizen who must get to New York have now? He can drive — an expensive, tiring chore. He can drive to New Haven and travel by rail from there, but it costs about $38.50 for one person to make the round trip, for example, from Mystic to New York this way— a far cry from our old $17 roundfrip coach excursion fare. It also possible to fly to the city for $44 plus the charge for limousine service.

There are five local trains from Springfield, Mass., to New Haven each morning, but only one from PrOvidence. Why shouldn't residents of Kingston, Westerly, Mystic and New London be offered service comparable to that enjoyed by those who live in towns like Windsor Locks, Meriden and Wallingford? Why have communities east of New Haven been deprived of early morning service to New York? Why are they being manipulated by the railroads?

We in Mystic, for example, now have one morning train to New Haven, which leaves at 9:30, and two (including early morning service) to Boston although the flow from this area is chiefly to New Haven and New York. If the object in cutting our service has been to cut time on the Boston‐Washington run, the result has been an unimpressive saving of 10 minutes.

Moreover, the majority who travel on business from Boston or Providence to Washington now elect to fly, and will undoUbtedlY continue to do so regardless of how much time is elminated from the rail run.

Those of us who support the drive for energy conservation and who rely on efficient public transportation feel strongly that Amtrack has been capricious with its experimental schedule, and does not understand the needs of the community dependent upon its services. Nor, once schedules are established or changed, are they publicized or otherwise made known to the community.

The rescheduling has simply confused the public, denied them public transportation and undermined the credibility of Amtrack's intent to serve. ■

Our economic future depends on our ability to get to the city

The New York TImesaohn F. Urwiller

Local citizens demonstrating at Mystic Station last year to raise funds for the station's restoration


The Best Snacks for Road Trips

This summer, the road trip was the only option for many of us to get in some kind of vacation or pay a long-overdue visit to faraway loved ones. And given the unpredictability of food options along routes these days, road trip snacks — always an essential item on the road trip packing list — were more important than ever.

There are certain essential qualities to a road trip snack: You should be able to eat it with one hand and with minimal mess. But beyond that, there are several interpretations of the genre. Road trip snacks may be the foods you find at gas stations and convenience stores, or indulgent treats that make the trip more bearable. Some road trippers select snacks based on their resemblance to an actual balanced meal, or on whether or not they’ll ensure the driver stays alert at the wheel. Eater staffers’ preferred snacks run the gamut. Here’s what fuels them through long car rides these days, as well as in better times.

The sweet

Bit-O-Honey: Bit-O-Honey works as a road trip snack because you can eat an entire bag of them and not feel awful (trust me, I just did this on a six-hour drive from Northern to Southern California). It’s somewhat hilarious that this honey-flavored taffy seems to only be available at truck stops and gas stations. Drivers and passengers alike will crush hours gnawing on these glorious sweets, with microscopic almond pieces giving a modicum of texture. Getting the sticky bits out of your teeth is the rest of the fun. — Matt Kang, Eater LA editor

Swedish Fish: I always have a bag of Swedish Fish on hand for a road trip. They perk you up, they’re chewy and sweet, and they’re the kind of candy I don’t eat every day. It’s also the ONLY time I drink Red Bull. — Lesley Suter, travel editor

Frozen Snickers: I’ve always maintained that a frozen Snickers bar is much, much better than an ice cream Snickers bar, the latter being an inferior product that melts too quickly and the former being something that will last in the car. — Ryan Sutton, Eater NY chief critic/data lead

Sour Patch Kids: My husband and I both agree that Sour Patch Kids are an absolute must on the road. I prefer the watermelon, but he likes the classics. I’m still bitter that the classic recipe seems to have changed, though I swear they’re not as sour as they used to be. — Rachel Blumenthal, Eater Boston editor

Beaver Nuggets: Road-tripping in Texas means you have to stop by Buc-ee’s and grab a bunch of their packaged snacks. Despite the unfortunate name, the Beaver Nuggets (actually sweet corn puffs) are really great. — Nadia Chaudhry, Eater Austin editor

Trail mix: I buy Archer Farms trail mix from Target — specifically the Monster one with tons of chocolate. Ignore the raisins. — Ellie Krupnick, managing editor

The savory

Snyder’s of Hanover Pretzel Pieces, Honey Mustard & Onion: These carry a Midas touch, covering your fingertips in a golden powder that plays off plain hard pretzels with two sources of tangy-sweet flavor: onion and honey mustard. Grasping for the few thin pieces that hold more powder than pretzel turns every bag into a treasure hunt. — Gabe Hiatt, Eater D.C. editor

Blue Diamond Almonds, Bold Wasabi & Soy: Those thin tubes of wasabi and soy sauce almonds are my road trip snack of choice for a number of reasons. First, they give you all the savory and salt pop of potato chips without the gross “ugh, did I just eat a whole bag of potato chips?” hangover. Second, the pain of wasabi build-up is a great way to stay awake during more monotonous stretches, far less cliched than slapping yourself or other self-abuse you see in the movies. Third, its narrow container is perfect to just tip into your mouth — an act that seems obscene (and obscures your vision) when it’s a chip bag, but makes perfect sense when the bag is long and narrow… and it saves your steering wheel, upholstery, etc. from every road tripper’s nemesis: snack grease. — Eve Batey, Eater SF news editor

Corn Nuts: Corn Nuts are not the sexiest snack, but they fit conveniently in your cupholder and you can just pick at them and shove a handful in your mouth with relative ease. Bonus: If you drop some, they don’t melt all over your car like a bunch of jerks. — Stefania Orrù, coordinating producer

Pizzeria Combos: Combos are so good, but not just any kind: pizza-flavored Combos are the best. They are super salty, bite-sized, and filled with some type of cheesy pizza flavoring. It’s like getting to dip a pretzel in cheese in every bite. I will always eat the whole entire bag on the road regardless of how long the drive is. — Stephen Pelletteri, executive producer

Regional chips: I go for regional takes on barbecue/red hot chips, especially if I am in a new-to-me area where there’s more opportunities to experiment with unfamiliar brands. Pennsylvania gas stations are the best bet for the intersection of multiple brands: One place might get you Snyder’s, Wise, Herr’s, Martin’s, Middleswarth, Utz… No real interest in mesquite/sweet varieties, though. — Missy Frederick, cities director

Ritz Bits, cheese: I only ever buy them at rest stops I’m scared to invite them into my life outside of that context. — Emma Alpern, senior copy editor

The more holistic meal plans

Carrots and celery: My most recent preferred road trip snack is just straight carrot sticks and celery. I did that on a road trip recently and, magically, I didn’t feel like crap at the end of the trip. Plus, they have that snap and crunch that’s a necessity for a good snack. — Brenna Houck, Eater Detroit editor

Cheese and charcuterie: On the very Los Angeles end of the spectrum, I get mini-cheese and charcuterie boards from Lady & Larder in Mar Vista and then hand feed my boyfriend soft cheeses and cured meats while he drives. — Nicole Adlman, cities manager

Beef jerky, nuts, coffee, and electrolytes: Most of my road trips of late are about the destination, not the journey, and involve driving for 10-14 hours straight — so the idea is to make as few as stops as possible. My road diet therefore is gas station hillbilly x keto bro: beef jerky, nuts, coffee, and Smart Water (or any other electrolyte-loaded water). All the salt means you only need to pit stop when your car does, no matter much you drink, while a zero carb regimen blunts any possible post-prandial zzzs there’s nothing worse than feeling super full when you’ve got six more hours in a car, even if you have that many episodes of You’re Wrong About left in your podcast queue.

The deep flaw in this plan is that you’re totally at the mercy of the gas station and whatever it merchandises. It’s sort of cheating, because going with the flow is how I approach long drives, but on my usual run between New York and Georgia, I’ve taken to plotting out where the territories of Wawa and Sheetz begin and end to guarantee access to actually edible jerky (the national brands are all trash now, RIP Field Trip) and potable coffee. (As someone who has no particular dog in that regional skirmish, I think Wawa and Sheetz are equally good? SORRY.) At the end of the day, it’s a road trip, and you can’t really appreciate arriving if you haven’t suffered along the way. — Matt Buchanan, executive editor


15 Ski Resorts Perfect for a Girls’ Getaway

The temperatures have dropped, snow is falling and it’s getting harder and harder to pry yourself away from Netflix. We get it. To get you moving (after a brewery visit with your besties, perhaps?) we’ve pulled together 15 ski resorts that are the perfect spot for your next girls-only long weekend. So grab your BFFs, pull out the snow boots and get ready to hit the slopes.

Alta Peruvian Lodge

A European-style ski lodge in Utah? Yep. This all-inclusive resort has been drawing in visitors and delighting locals for more than 65 years. The reason for standing the test of the time is simple: The place is filled with people seeking adventure, fun and a sense of community. (Photo via Alta Peruvian)

Sun Valley

Anchored by Bald and Dollar Mountains, Sun Valley, ID is a pioneer of destination skiing. Snowboarders and skiers can ride more than 2,000 acres of terrain and at the end of the day cozy up in one of their quintessential ski lodges. (Photo via @sunvalley)

Squaw Valley

Home to the 1960 Olympic Winter Games, Squaw Valley, CA has over 6,000 acres of diverse terrain surrounded by Lake Tahoe and the Sierra Nevadas. More than 300 days of sunshine make this an Instagram-worthy getaway. (Photo via Squaw Valley)

Cataloochee Ski Area

You and your girls not skiers? Not a problem at this southern site in North Carolina. With 50 acres of skiable area and an elevation of just 5,400 feet, your beginner crew can enjoy the trip without constantly worrying about running into expert-level athletes. (Photo via Cataloochee Facebook)

Keystone Ski Resort

This Colorado favorite is conveniently located just two hours west of Denver, making it an easy long-weekend getaway. Plus, the interconnected network of gondolas and ski lifts makes sure that you never get too big for your ski boots and provides some of the best views of the mountains. (Photo via @keystone_resort)

Telluride Ski Resort

Bring the whole crew here, because there’s something for everyone at Telluride, CO. Looking for more than just great slopes (which they have)? Telluride offers dog sledding, cat skiing (as in Snowcat, not feline cats!), fine dining, a robust nightlife and more. (Photo via @telluridemtn)

Breckenridge

You can’t have a list of ski resorts without some of the classics. Breckenridge, CO encompasses close to 3,000 acres and boasts five peaks and four terrain parks. Still not impressed? Catch a ride on North America’s highest chairlift, the Imperial Express, for views you won’t soon forget. (Photo via @breckenridgemtn)

Whistler Blackcomb

Adventure seekers, look no further than Whistler Blackcomb in Vancouver. Its two mountains have been graced by Olympians, elite athletes and Après Ski fans alike. Ever since seeing its beauty during the 2010 Olympics, we couldn’t pass up putting this mountain town on our list. (Photo via Whistler Blackcomb)

Jackson Hole

Really you’re going to need at least a week if you want to come close to experiencing all Jackson Hole, WY has to offer, but the main Mountain Resort sits in the Bridger-Teton National Forest, with more than 2,500 acres of some of the best slopes in North America. (Photo via Jackson Hole Mountain Resort)

Holiday Valley Ski Resort

Looking for a group getaway for you and your friends? This western NY spot can accommodate all skill levels, produces fresh snow and brings the buzz with a hometown, come-have-a-beer-with-us vibe. (Photo via @holidayvalley)

Steamboat Resort

Six mountain peaks, two terrain parks and almost 3,000 acres of skiable slopes? Safe to say we could spend forever finding our way through Steamboat, CO. (Photo via @steamboatresort)

Killington Resort

If you can’t find something to do at this Vermont-based resort, you’re doing ski trips wrong. From ice skating and cross country skiing to more than 100 bars and restaurants, Killington defines having it all. (Photo via Killington)

Stowe Mountain Resort

If you’re looking for the classic New England ski experience, Stowe is the place to go. Top-notch accommodations and lots of great mom and pop stores are abundant. Plus, the tallest mountain in Vermont and the Von Trapp Family Lodge both call Stowe home. (Photo via Stowe Mountain Resort)

Whiteface Mountain

Located in the Adirondack Mountains in Lake Placid, NY and the home of the 1980 Winter Olympics, Whiteface offers visitors original Olympic landmarks to enjoy while they try out the slopes. Oh, and did we mention it’s home to the tallest mountain in the Northeast? Gold medal for Whiteface. (Photo via @whiteface_mtn)

Mont Tremblant Ski Resort

Feel like you’re skiing in the Swiss Alps, but never leave North America. Besides great skiing for more experienced snow bunnies, you’ll be living a seriously chic French lifestyle in Quebec, complete with great food and a certain je ne sais quoi. (Photo via Mont Tremblant)