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Caramelised Brussels recipe

Caramelised Brussels recipe

  • Recipes
  • Diet & lifestyle
  • Vegetarian
  • Vegetarian meals

The perfect side dish to any roast! Brussels sprouts are sauted with red onions, red wine vinegar and caster sugar until caramelised, then garnished with pistachios. Serve at your next Sunday lunch or Christmas dinner.

322 people made this

IngredientsServes: 8

  • 1.8kg Brussels sprouts
  • 115g unsalted butter
  • 4 small red onions, thickly sliced
  • 4 tablespoons red wine vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons caster sugar
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 65g pistachios, coarsely chopped

MethodPrep:10min ›Cook:15min ›Ready in:25min

  1. Place Brussels sprouts in a steamer insert over boiling water. Cover saucepan and steam 8-10 minutes or until Brussels sprouts are tender yet crisp.
  2. Melt the butter in a deep frying pan, add the onions and 3 tablespoons vinegar; cook until onions brown.
  3. Add the Brussels sprouts, sugar and remaining vinegar. Saute over medium heat until the Brussels sprouts are lightly caramelised.
  4. Season with salt and pepper to taste and garnish with pistachios.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(344)

Reviews in English (251)

by naples34102

A very good friend whose judgment I trust talked me into making these. I didn't tell her that I turned my nose up at the recipe when I read it. I didn't even like making these, and looked forward even less to eating them. Imagine my taste buds' surprise to find they liked these! Good flavor arises from the caramelization of the onions and brussels sprouts, the little bit of sugar is just enough to eliminate the bitterness brussels sprouts can have, and the roasted, salted pistachios I used were the perfect complement, both in taste and appearance. This just proves what moms like to say, that you should try something before you say you don't like it!-28 Jun 2008

by Julie62

I like the idea behind this recipe, however adding the vinegar with the onions prevents carmelization. Next time I'll carmelize the onions in butter and THEN add the vinegar.-28 Nov 2008

by Wilemon

We thought this was pretty good but the whole Brussels sprout did not have a lot of flavor. I will make this again cutting the Brussels sprouts in half to absorb more flavors and add some garlic.-13 Aug 2004


Courtesy of Chef Raymond Weber, CUT by Wolfgang Puck, New York City

Ingredients

Kosher salt
1 1/2 pounds Brussels sprouts, trimmed and halved lengthwise
Nonstick cooking spray
1/2 tablespoon dark brown sugar
Freshly ground black pepper
1/4 cup chicken or vegetable stock
1 tablespoon chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Method

1. Bring several inches of water to a boil in a large saucepan. Fill a large bowl with ice cubes and water.

2.
When the water is boiling, salt the water. Add the Brussels sprouts and cook just until the water returns to a boil and the sprouts turn bright green, 1 to 2 minutes. Drain and immediately immerse the Brussels sprouts in the ice water. Let cool for several minutes. Drain thoroughly, and pat the sprouts completely dry with a clean kitchen towel or paper towels.

3.
Heat a cast-iron skillet or a sauté pan large enough to hold all the Brussels sprouts in a single layer (or 2 smaller pans, if necessary) over medium-low to medium heat. Spray the pan(s) evenly with nonstick cooking spray and sprinkle with the sugar. Place the Brussels sprouts cut-side down in the pan and sprinkle lightly with salt and pepper.

4.
Cook until the undersides of the Brussels sprouts are caramelized and a deep brown color, 5 to 7 minutes. Drizzle with the stock and continue to cook, stirring, to glaze the sprouts, 1 to 2 minutes more.

5.
Serve from the skillet, or transfer to a serving bowl or plates. Garnish with the parsley. Serve immediately.

Photo courtesy of CUT by Wolfgang Puck New York.

Aaron Hutcherson is an editor for the MICHELIN Guide Digital Platform. An accomplished cook, Aaron can most often be found creating dishes in his own kitchen or exploring new restaurants in search of a great meal.


Brussel Sprouts (Brussels Sprouts)

I have such a hard time with this word. IS it Brussels Sprouts or Brussel Sprouts. Technically it should be Brussels Sprouts&mdash but the name in the all mighty google search comes up both ways! (win for me&mdash I use it interchangeably.)

Brussels Sprouts were originally cultivated in Belgium thus the Brussels should be capitalized. I know, kind of nonsensical info for a recipe, but it&rsquos one of those things that always seems to come up when I get in a conversation about them.

Brussels Sprouts are in the cabbage family that grows on a stalk&hellip. like little buds. If you can buy them that way versus already cut from the stalk they are much fresher.

  • Slice Lengthwise
  • Make Vinegarette
  • Char Sprouts
  • Add Cooked Crisp Bacon
  • Stir in Vinegarette

Caramelised Brussels sprouts with prosciutto

A cracking way to make Brussels sprouts more enticing is to cook them so they start to colour up. If you’ve got some prosciutto on hand, it makes a great accompaniment. In its absence, a little fried bacon can also do the trick.

Preparation

Cooking

Skill level

Ingredients

  • 500 g Brussels sprouts, cleaned well
  • 2-3 tbsp pork fat
  • 50 g finely sliced prosciutto

Cook's notes

Oven temperatures are for conventional if using fan-forced (convection), reduce the temperature by 20˚C. | We use Australian tablespoons and cups: 1 teaspoon equals 5 ml 1 tablespoon equals 20 ml 1 cup equals 250 ml. | All herbs are fresh (unless specified) and cups are lightly packed. | All vegetables are medium size and peeled, unless specified. | All eggs are 55-60 g, unless specified.

Instructions

1. Cut the Brussels sprouts in half through the stem.

2. Heat the pork fat in a large heavy-based frying pan over high heat. Add the Brussels sprouts, cut-side down and cook until starting to colour. Pop a lid on the pan at this stage and let them fry and steam in their own juices for about 2 minutes. They’re done when they’re dark brown on the cut side.

3. Remove from the pan, place on a plate and top with the strips of prosciutto.

Photography by Kitti Gould

Matthew Evans is back in his brand-new series of Gourmet Farmer, 8pm Thursday nights on SBS and on SBS On Demand.


Pan Roasted Caramelized Brussels Sprouts with Bacon Recipe

Until I made this recipe, I didn’t see what the “big deal” was about eating those little green leafy balls. This Pan-Roasted Caramelized Brussel Sprouts with Bacon Recipe is super easy to make and it’s done on the stove with minimal prep work.

The first time I ate Brussels sprouts was 20 years ago in Berlin, Germany. Just a month into my exchange year, my host family served a bowl of steamed, unseasoned sprouts with boiled weiners. Oh man. I think I turned green just looking at the food in front of me. Of course I ate the meal, mostly out of politeness, but I did not eat Brussels sprouts again for a good 15 years after that.

Lately, I’ve been wanting to try them in a way that could possibly be tolerated by my kids –some of them anyway. Immediately, I looked for recipes that included bacon, since bacon is typically a loved flavor by everyone in the house.

“Hey look!” It’s got BACON!!” I pointed out a few times. Still, they (my 3 wonderful children) looked at me like I was speaking another language. “I cooked it with butter….” nothing.

“Well, y’all are missing out!” I said. And off I went to eat one serving, then two, then quite possibly a third of these wonderfully caramelized sprouts. Never in my life I imagined that they could taste this delicious!

I will try serving them again with the kids tomorrow but in a different way. I used the leftover Brussels sprouts in this quiche recipe (minus the salsa and cheddar). In case you have leftovers, I wrote out the recipe for the mini quiches below as well.


Recipe Summary

  • 12 cups small, firm fresh Brussels sprouts (about 2-3/4 pounds)
  • ⅓ cup sugar
  • 3 tablespoons butter
  • ¼ cup red wine vinegar
  • ¼ cup water
  • ¾ teaspoon salt
  • Sea salt or kosher salt (optional)
  • Freshly ground black pepper (optional)

To prepare Brussels sprouts, peel off two or three of the dark outer leaves from each one discard. After pulling off and discarding the two or three leaves, pull off several more leaves from each sprout until each one is about 1/2-inch in diameter. Quarter each sprout. Set aside with the removed leaves.

In a Dutch oven or an extra-large skillet, heat the sugar over medium-high heat until sugar begins to melt, shaking pan occasionally to heat sugar evenly. Do not stir. Once sugar starts to melt, reduce heat to low cook about 5 minutes more or until all of the sugar is melted and golden, stirring as needed with a wooden spoon. Add butter stir butter until melted. Add red wine vinegar. Cook and stir for 1 minute.

Carefully add the water and salt. Bring to boiling add the quartered Brussels sprouts and the leaves. Return to boiling reduce heat. Simmer, covered, for 4 minutes. Uncover and cook about 5 minutes more or until most of the liquid has been absorbed and the sprouts are coated with a golden glaze, gently stirring occasionally.

Transfer mixture to a serving dish. If desired, sprinkle with sea salt and pepper. Serve immediately. Makes 12 to 14 side-dish servings.


  • olive oil spray
  • 4 strip of thick-cut applewood smoked bacon, diced
  • 1 cup diced yellow onion
  • 1-1/2 pounds fresh brussels sprouts, trimmed and halved
  • 2 cloves garlic, mixed
  • kosher salt
  • freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons reduced balsamic glaze
  • minced fresh parsley, for serving
  1. Spray a large 12-inch skillet with olive oil, add in the diced bacon and heat over medium heat. Stir and cook the bacon for 5 minutes.
  2. Add in the chopped onion, stir and cook until the bacon is crispy and the onions are soft and translucent and the edges are golden.
  3. Use a slotted spoon to transfer the bacon and onions to a paper towel lined plate, leaving the bacon fat still in the skillet.
  4. In a single layer place the halved brussels sprouts, cut-side down in the skillet before adding the rest. Cover and allow the steam to help to cook the sprouts. Let the brussels sprouts cook for 5-8 minutes this way before stirring.
  5. Add the bacon and onions back into the skillet with the minced garlic. Stir and continue to cook the sprouts until fork tender but not too soft. Season with a little bit of kosher salt and a lot of black pepper, to taste.
  6. Drizzle in two tablespoons of the balsamic glaze, stir and serve hot with a sprinkle of minced parsley.

Recipe Summary

  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 3 onions, thinly sliced
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 pound Brussels sprouts, trimmed and halved
  • 1 teaspoon fresh thyme
  • 4 cups chicken stock
  • salt and ground black pepper to taste
  • ½ cup sour cream
  • 4 dashes hot pepper sauce (such as Frank's RedHot®), or to taste

Combine oil and onions in a pot over low heat. Cover and cook until very tender and soft, 30 to 40 minutes. Remove cover and sprinkle sugar over onions. Cook, uncovered, until onions are light brown, 10 to 15 minutes more.

Stir Brussels sprouts and thyme into the pot. Pour in stock and season soup with salt and pepper. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer until sprouts are just tender, about 10 minutes.

Allow soup to cool slightly. Blend to a smooth consistency using an immersion blender. Reheat gently, about 2 minutes, and adjust seasoning if necessary.

Top each portion of soup with a spoonful of sour cream and a dash of hot pepper sauce.


Creamed Brussels Sprouts with Caramelized Onions

Hey, we love a batch of crispy roasted brussels. But sometimes the time is right for the mac-and-cheese equivalent of veggies. That&rsquos where creamed brussels sprouts come into play. Our favorite green meets comfort food in one of the best side dishes ever created.

Caramelized Onions

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil

1 tablespoon unsalted butter

1 large sweet onion, thinly sliced

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

Creamed Brussels Sprouts

2 tablespoons unsalted butter

2 tablespoons all-purpose flour

1¼ cups shredded Gruyère cheese

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

1¾ pounds brussels sprouts, trimmed and halved

Crispy Sage

2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil


Sautéed Brussels sprouts with caramelised garlic, lemon & chilli

One of the disadvantages of having our dining room in the conservatory at the back of the house is that there is no hiding your kitchen and your work-in-progress from your guests. I am inevitably in the kitchen when guests arrive and they either pop in to say hi before returning to the lounge, or pass through the kitchen on their way straight to the dining room. Either way, at some point they materialise by my side to peek over my shoulder at what’s bubbling away on the stove, or roasting away in the oven. Don’t get me wrong – I love having people joining me in the kitchen! Most often, the kitchen is where the party is realyl happening at my house: it’s where people perch on stools and catch up where we finish the champagne before starters are even served it’s where evil plans of lethal cocktails are hatched where gossip is shared and problems are solved. So yes, I love company in the kitchen.

But having people in my kitchen also has its downsides. For a start, there is no way to hide that I am a messy cook. We have no scullery, so all the debris of cooking is right there on show for them to see. It also means that there is no surprising the guests when I bring dishes to the table and whip off the lids – everything is poked, prodded, examined, questioned – and even tasted (despite my dire threats of bodily harm if I see ONE MORE PERSON STICKING A SPOON INTO THAT CHOCOLATE SAUCE! This was pretty much how it went down at a recent festive lunch party. “Ooh, so what’s in here?”, asked a friend, whipping the lid off a Tupperware. “Ummm… sprouts? You’re giving us Brussels sprouts?” Actually, yes I am – it’s Christmas, right? “Well, let me just tell you, I don’t like Brussels sprouts. They smell like underarms. I only like them prepared in one very particular way. How are you planning to prepare them?” [Note to self: put down the knife and count to ten.] Mustering a close approximation of a serene smile, I said: “Wait and see.” The gauntlet had been unequivocally thrown down. But I wasn’t worried. I had a secret weapon, and his name was Ottolenghi.

What on earth is it that people have against Brussels sprouts? They are perfectly innocuous wild cabbage buds that are ready for harvest in the late Autumn and early winter, but people’s reactions to them are as exreme as they are to Marmite! I count no less than nine separate “I hate Brussels sprouts” groups on Facebook. But as I have written before, my personal opinion is that not liking Brussels sprouts is like not liking sex: you’re just doing it wrong, baby. And by wrong, I mean boiling the poor little things to death. You see, overcooking releases the chemical compound glucosinolate sinigrin which has a sulphurous odour – and as anybody who has ever encountered a rotten egg will know, sulphurous is not a good aroma for food. So there is a simple solution: don’t boil them! Roast them, sautée them, or shred and stir-fry them – any which way but boil, in fact. My go-to recipe for Brussels sprouts is to sautée them very simply with shallots and garlic or when I want to push the boat out I do them shredded and then sautéed with pancetta and pine nuts. But the other day, my husband mailed me a new recipe for them that had caught his eye. Bear in mind, Nick is a blokey sort of bloke and recipes do not generally catch his eye – so I knew this had to be something exceptional.

The recipe in question was this one from the fabulous Yotam Ottolenghi, whose praises I have been singing since 2008 when I made his cranberry pear upside down cake and his chargrilled asaragus, zucchini & halloumi salad, so I had very high expectations – and I was not disappointed. Like all his recipes, it is a bit of a faff with quite a few steps to be followed before the final assembly but let me assure you that the effort is repaid a hundredfold. Here, you need to peel and caramelise four heads (yes, heads, not cloves) of garlic then peel a lemon and cook the peel in a lemon syrup and then prepare and sautée the sprouts before assembling the whole thing. My advice is to start early! The end result is revelatory the interplay of sweet, spicy and tart flavours nothing short of spectacular. Worth every second of prep time. Ottolenghi presents this as a salad to be served at room temperature but I omitted some ingredients (basil and Parmesan) and served it hot as a vegetable side dish.

And my picky friend? She had two helpings. Sprout skeptics – nil. Ottolenghi – one.

SAUTéED BRUSSELS SPROUTS WITH CARAMELISED GARLIC, LEMON & CHILLI (serves 6)

4 heads garlic, cloves separated and peeled
About 150ml olive oil
2 tsp balsamic vinegar
50g caster sugar
90ml water
Salt and black pepper
1 medium lemon
600g brussels sprouts
1 red chilli, finely chopped

Bring some water to boili in a small saucepan. Drop the garlic in and blanch for three minutes, then remove the garlic and water, dry the pan and return it to the heat.

Pour 2 tablespoons of oil into the pan. Return the garlic to the pan and fry on high heat for two minutes, stirring, until cloves are golden all over. Add the vinegar, a tablespoon of sugar, the water and some salt. Bring to a boil and simmer on medium heat for five minutes, until barely any liquid is left, then set aside.

Using a vegetable peeler or very sharp knife, shave the skin off the lemon in wide strips, making sure you do not get any of the white pith. Cut the strips into 1mm-2mm thick julienne slices and place in a small pan. Squeeze the lemon into a measuring jug and add water to bring the volume of liquid up to 100ml. Pour this over the strips of peel, add the remaining sugar, stir to mix and bring to a simmer. Cook for 12-15 minutes, until the syrup is reduced to about a third of its original volume. Set aside to cool down. (NB – do not cook this too long or else you may end up with lemon caramel brittle!)

Trim the bases off the sprouts and halve them from top to bottom. Heat four tablespoons of oil in a large, heavy-based pan, add half the sprouts, season with salt and pepper and cook on high heat for five minutes. Stir them when those with the cut side down start developing a good, dark colour – but do not stir so much that they start breaking up. If the paan cooks dry, add a couple of tablespoons of water. The sprouts need to soften but still retain some firmness. When done, transfer them to a bowl and repeat with the remaining oil and sprouts.

Stir the chilli, the garlic and its syrup into the sprouts, then add the lemon peel (I added a little of its caramelly syrup too). Season with salt and pepper as necessary and serve immediately.


Courtesy of Chef Raymond Weber, CUT by Wolfgang Puck, New York City

Ingredients

Kosher salt
1 1/2 pounds Brussels sprouts, trimmed and halved lengthwise
Nonstick cooking spray
1/2 tablespoon dark brown sugar
Freshly ground black pepper
1/4 cup chicken or vegetable stock
1 tablespoon chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Method

1. Bring several inches of water to a boil in a large saucepan. Fill a large bowl with ice cubes and water.

2.
When the water is boiling, salt the water. Add the Brussels sprouts and cook just until the water returns to a boil and the sprouts turn bright green, 1 to 2 minutes. Drain and immediately immerse the Brussels sprouts in the ice water. Let cool for several minutes. Drain thoroughly, and pat the sprouts completely dry with a clean kitchen towel or paper towels.

3.
Heat a cast-iron skillet or a sauté pan large enough to hold all the Brussels sprouts in a single layer (or 2 smaller pans, if necessary) over medium-low to medium heat. Spray the pan(s) evenly with nonstick cooking spray and sprinkle with the sugar. Place the Brussels sprouts cut-side down in the pan and sprinkle lightly with salt and pepper.

4.
Cook until the undersides of the Brussels sprouts are caramelized and a deep brown color, 5 to 7 minutes. Drizzle with the stock and continue to cook, stirring, to glaze the sprouts, 1 to 2 minutes more.

5.
Serve from the skillet, or transfer to a serving bowl or plates. Garnish with the parsley. Serve immediately.

Photo courtesy of CUT by Wolfgang Puck New York.

Aaron Hutcherson is an editor for the MICHELIN Guide Digital Platform. An accomplished cook, Aaron can most often be found creating dishes in his own kitchen or exploring new restaurants in search of a great meal.