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Bombay Sliders with Garlic Curry Sauce

Bombay Sliders with Garlic Curry Sauce

Ingredients

  • 1 cup mayonnaise, divided
  • 6 1/4 teaspoons curry powder, divided
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons plain yogurt
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons ketchup
  • 6 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro
  • 1/4 cup minced green onions
  • 2 tablespoons minced peeled fresh ginger
  • 3/4 teaspoon hot chili powder or Hungarian hot paprika
  • 12 small dinner rolls, cut horizontally in half, lightly toasted

Recipe Preparation

  • Mix 3/4 cup mayonnaise, 2 1/4 teaspoons curry powder, and next 3 ingredients in small bowl for sauce. Let stand at room temperature while preparing sliders.

  • Place turkey, next 6 ingredients, remaining 1/4 cup mayonnaise, and 4 teaspoons curry powder in large bowl. Mix with fork or hands just until blended (do not overmix). Divide mixture into 12 equal portions. Using wet hands, form each portion into patty about 1/2 inch thick.

  • Preheat broiler or heat 1 tablespoon oil in heavy large skillet over medium-high heat. If broiling patties, brush rimmed baking sheet with 1 tablespoon oil and arrange patties on sheet. Broil (or cover patties in skillet and cook in batches) until cooked through, pressing patties down lightly with spatula before turning over, about 3 minutes per side (or 4 minutes per side if cooking in skillet).

  • Place patties on bottom halves of rolls. Top each patty with sauce. Cover with roll tops. Place 3 sliders on each of 4 plates and serve.

Reviews Section

Bombay Sliders with Garlic Curry Sauce

Place turkey, 6 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro, 1/4 cup chopped green onions, 2 tablespoons chopped peeled fresh ginger, 2 teaspoons ground cumin, 3/4 teaspoon hot chili powder, 1 teaspoon salt, remaining 1/4 cup mayonnaise, and 4 teaspoons curry powder in large bowl. Mix with fork or hands just until blended (do not over mix). Divide mixture into 12 equal portions. Using wet hands, form each portion into patty about 1/2 inch thick.

Heat 1 tablespoon oil in heavy large skillet over medium-high heat. Cook in batches until cooked through, pressing patties down lightly with a turner before turning over, about 4 minutes per side

Mix 3/4 cup mayonnaise, 2 1/4 teaspoons curry powder, 1 1/2 tablespoons plain yogurt, 1 1/2 tablespoons ketchup, 1 garlic clove in bowl for sauce. Let stand at room temperature while preparing sliders.

Place patties on bottom halves of rolls. Top each patty with sauce. Cover with roll tops.


Bombay Sliders

1 cup mayonnaise, divided (I used 1/2 cup mayo)
6-1/4 teaspoons curry powder, divided (I used 3-1/2 teaspoons)
1-1/2 tablespoons plain yogurt (I used 3/4 tablespoon)
1-1/2 tablespoons ketchup (I used 3/4 tablespoon)
1 garlic clove, minced
2 pounds ground turkey
6 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro
1/4 cup minced green onions
2 tablespoons minced peeled fresh ginger (I used 1 tablespoon ginger paste)
2 teaspoons ground cumin
3/4 teaspoon hot chili powder or Hungarian hot paprika
1 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon olive oil
12 small dinner rolls, cut horizontally in half, lightly toasted preparation

Mix 3/4 cup mayonnaise, 2 1/4 teaspoons curry powder, and next 3 ingredients in small bowl for sauce. Let stand at room temperature while preparing sliders.

Place turkey, next 6 ingredients, remaining 1/4 cup mayonnaise, and 4 teaspoons curry powder in large bowl. Mix with fork or hands just until blended (do not overmix). Divide mixture into 12 equal portions. Using wet hands, form each portion into patty about 1/2 inch thick.

Preheat broiler or heat 1 tablespoon oil in heavy large skillet over medium-high heat. If broiling patties, brush rimmed baking sheet with 1 tablespoon oil and arrange patties on sheet. Broil (or cover patties in skillet and cook in batches) until cooked through, pressing patties down lightly with spatula before turning over, about 3 minutes per side (or 4 minutes per side if cooking in skillet).

Place patties on bottom halves of rolls. Top each patty with sauce. Cover with roll tops. Place 3 sliders on each of 4 plates and serve.

Sweetnicks’ Notes: I roughly halved the sauce ingredients and still had plenty leftover.


Recipe Summary

  • 1 (12 count) package Hawaiian bread rolls (such as King's®)
  • ½ cup marinara sauce
  • 8 ounces grated mozzarella cheese
  • 3 Roma tomatoes, sliced
  • ¼ cup chopped fresh basil
  • ¼ cup butter, melted
  • 2 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese
  • 2 cloves roasted garlic, finely minced
  • 2 teaspoons Italian seasoning

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F (190 degrees C). Grease a 9x13-inch pan.

Cut the rolls in half. Set the bottom halves into the bottom of the prepared pan and spread with marinara sauce. Place a layer of mozzarella cheese over the marinara and add a layer of tomatoes over the cheese. Spread basil over the tomatoes and add the top halves of the rolls.

Combine melted butter, Parmesan cheese, garlic, and Italian seasoning in a bowl stir to combine. Brush over the tops of the sliders.

Bake in the preheated oven until the insides are gooey and the tops are golden brown, 10 to 15 minutes.


Slider recipes perfect for Hawkeye tailgating and Labor Day weekend

When you’re 10, is there a better smell in the world than a fresh box of crayons?

It’s been 40 years since I have been 10, and yet I remember that smell as if it was yesterday. Everything about this time of year seemed new. In addition to the crayons, there was a new school year complete with new teachers and new classes. There was a new desk that was still fresh and clean, and textbooks that, while not technically “new,” were at least new to me. Heck, it’s been four decades, and I still remember some of the stories we read in our fifth-grade reader. I especially loved one story by Bertrand Brinley — “The Strange Sea Monster of Strawberry Lake” — so much that I later bought a collection of his stories. I still have it.

It wasn’t just school, however. September television was a wonderland of new programs, both on primetime and on Saturday mornings. I would eagerly watch the promos for weeks, weighing the supposed strengths and weaknesses of each new show. In 1977 there was “Lou Grant” — which we were allowed to watch — and “Soap” — which we were not.

Michael Knock (Photo: The Press-Citizen)

My point is that the end of summer used to be exciting. Now, however, it feels as though the end of summer really means “the end.” Instead of focusing on the box of crayons, all I can think about is the coming of winter. I know that it’s still months away, but you can already feel a shift in the seasons. It gets dark earlier and even a few trees have started to show flashes of gold and red leaves.

But just when you start to despair about the end of summer, something comes along to get you excited all over again. This weekend, two of those things arrive at just about the same time: Labor Day and Hawkeye football.

Labor Day is the traditional end of summer. Hawkeye football is the unofficial start of fall (at least for me). Thus, in some ways, they are opposites. Yet, both offer great ways to celebrate, especially if you own a grill.

Because while summer may be coming to a close, we still have months of good grilling time ahead. It might be 10 degrees outside, but Hawkeye fans will be out there in their parkas and gloves, holding a beer in one hand and a spatula in the other.

So here are a few options for those of you wanting to get your “grill” on this weekend. I am focusing on foods that are great for both your Labor Day picnic and for your Hawkeye tailgate. Specifically, I went with sliders. I like these miniature sandwiches because you can eat as many or as few as you like. That makes them great for a gathering, whether it’s in your backyard or in the parking lot behind Kinnick.

And while none of these recipes evoke that smell of new crayons, they do taste a heck of a lot better.

Sliders are great for a gathering, whether it’s in your backyard or in the parking lot behind Kinnick Stadium. (Photo: Michael Knock / Special to the Press-Citizen)

Basic Hamburger Sliders

This isn’t so much a recipe as a set of instructions. That’s because I wanted to keep things simple. You can always doll up your burgers with one of the sauces at the end of the column. Or you can just let the meat speak for itself.

1-2 pounds ground chuck (it depends on how many sliders you want)

Garlic powder

Onion Powder

Black Pepper

Small Rolls (Grocery stores now sell all manner of slider buns from cottage rolls to pretzel buns choose your favorite)

Divide your beef into small hamburger patties — 2 to 3 ounces each. Season them with a few shakes of garlic powder, onion powder, salt and pepper.

Grill them over medium heat with the lid closed for about 5 minutes per side. Add a slice of your favorite cheese (or don’t), and grill for about one more minute.

Place on one of the buns, add one of the sauces below, and you’re done.

Bombay Turkey Sliders

I found this recipe in “The Grilling Book” from Bon Appetit.

Turkey burgers are a great alternative to beef once in awhile. Here, the meat is wonderfully complemented by the addition of numerous spices.

The recipe calls for dark turkey meat, but that can be hard to find (most people want leaner white meat). I made mine with the white meat, and they were fine. They shrank a bit, but they tasted great. The recipe says that if you can’t find dark meat, you can add a little bacon grease.

2 pounds ground dark turkey meat

¼ cup mayonnaise

6 tablespoons chopped cilantro

¼ cup chopped green onions

2 tablespoons minced peeled fresh ginger

4 teaspoons curry powder

2 teaspoons ground cumin

¾ teaspoon hot chili powder or hot paprika

1 teaspoon kosher salt

12 small dinner rolls, sliced

Place the first nine ingredients in a large bowl. Mix with your hands until just blended. Divide mixture into 12 equal portions. With wet hands (it’s important that your hands are wet!) form each portion into a patty about ½-inch thick. Using your thumb make a small indentation in the center of each patty.

Oil the grate of your grill. Heat the grill to medium-high. Grill patties about 3 minutes per side.

Top sliders with one of the sauces in the following recipes.

Garlic-Curry Sauce

This is the sauce that is meant to go with the Bombay sliders above. It, too, is from the book from Bon Appetit.

¾ cup mayonnaise

2¼ teaspoon curry powder

1½ tablespoons plain yogurt

1½ tablespoons ketchup

1 garlic clove, minced

Combine all ingredients in a small bowl. That’s it!

Roasted Red Pepper Aioli

Aioli is a typically a sauce similar to mayonnaise made with eggs and garlic. This recipe from the Chicago Sun-Times pushes that definition a bit by leaving out the eggs. Still, I hope you’ll give it a try. The sauce has a far more gentle flavor than ketchup. Still, it matches beautifully with the smoky flavor of grilled burgers.

There are several ways to roast red peppers. Because we have a gas stove, I like to place the red pepper directly on the burner with the flame turned up high. As the skins blacken , I turn it until the entire pepper is charred. Remove it from the flame and place it in a paper bag and leave it there for 5 minutes. Next, rinse the pepper under cold running water and pull off the blackened skin (it should just pull right off).

If you don’t have a gas stove, you can do the same thing over the flames of your grill.

1 red bell pepper (roasted according to the instructions above)

1 clove garlic

2 tablespoons fresh parsley

4 drops hot pepper sauce

1 tablespoon olive oil

1 teaspoon freshly squeezed lemon juice

¼ teaspoon kosher salt

¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Roast the red pepper following the instructions in the paragraph above the ingredients. Once you’re done, remove the stem and the core. Quarter the pepper and place it in the food processor. Chop the pepper. Add garlic and parsley and process until pureed.

Add hot pepper sauce, olive oil, lemon juice, salt and pepper to red pepper mixture. Puree until smooth. Transfer to a serving bowl, cover and refrigerate for a minimum of 20 minutes or for up to two days. Serve at room temperature.


Spotlight On: Mini Burgers and Sliders

The mini burger/slider trend caught on with trendy restaurants a while ago, so it’s nothing new (especially if you count the fact that Krystal and White Castle have been scratching that itch forever), but they’re popular for good reason — easy to eat and a lot of flavor in a few bites. Get some recipes (including a vegan one!) below…

We like the idea of a plate of mini burgers this time of year. They hint at summer barbecues but are easily made inside in a frying pan, not on a grill. If you are a football fan, they make perfect tailgate food.

And we love the fact that each burger only needs a little dab of a topping. No need to pile on lettuce, tomato, onion, pickles, and loads of ketchup. Tiny burgers need tiny toppings — just one or two things — to keep them a one-handed, quick meal. So you can make an interesting sauce, drop a spoonful of caramelized onions on top, or layer in a pickled beet. The ones pictured above have an arugula pesto on top.

Here are a few recipes from our archives and the web:

(Image: Flickr member Chotda, licensed for use under Creative Commons)

Elizabeth Passarella is the author of the essay collection Good Apple and a contributing editor at Southern Living. A former editor at Real Simple and Vogue, she has spent more than 20 years writing about food, travel, home design, and parenting in outlets including The New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Parents, Martha Stewart Weddings, Coastal Living, Airbnb, and The Kitchn. Elizabeth grew up in Memphis, Tennessee and now lives with her husband and three children in New York City.


Crock-Pot Bombay Potatoes

I am all about trying new dishes, especially dishes that can test my taste buds and get my kitchen smelling yummy. My really good friend Nicole is always giving me recipes to try.

She gets a lot of new recipes from her mother-in-law and picks up other recipes from her family members (she is not afraid to ask for a recipe).

Nicole called me up one day and told me that I just had to try these Bombay Potatoes. She said her sister brought them to a family meal and they were very tasty and were made using the spice Garam masala.

Garam masala is a spice that is actually a combination of many spices and then those spices are toasted and ground up and used in many Indian, Pakistaini and other South Asian dishes.

Unfortunatly I am only able to find Garam masala spice mixture in Ethnic food specialty stores (and those are pretty rare in my part of Illinois). But thanks to the World Wide Web you can easily purchase it online and have it delivered.

If you don’t have the patience to wait a few days for your spices to come via FedEx then the next best option is the make Garam masala at home with this easy recipe.

You will however need a spice mill or coffee grinder so that you can grind and mix the spices. This is the recipe that I have used in this recipe and it is super tasty!


Vada pav recipe | how to make vada pav | wada pav recipe

vada pav recipe | how to make vada pav | wada pav with detailed photo and video recipe. a popular indian street food recipe prepared mainly with pav bread and deep fried batata vada stuffing. most commonly, this snack is also referred as indian burger or aka bombay burger because it hails from maharashtra or marathi cuisine. generally, it is served as an evening snack, but can also be adapted to breakfast.vada pav recipe | how to make vada pav | wada pav with step by step photo and video recipe. mumbai or previously referred as bombay is known for its fast life which basically can be seen its mumbai or marathi cuisine. most of the street or any popular tourist attraction places are filled with street vendors with myriad fast food dishes. vada pav is one such easy and tasty fast food dish, filled with carbohydrates and fibre.

unlike the traditional burger recipe, vada pav recipe is much easier and quicker to prepare and assemble it. the critical part of any good wada pav recipe lies in its crispy and savoury vada or batata vada. these patties are slightly different from the conventional aloo bonda or vegetable bonda. basically, the batata vada stuffing is mainly made from potatoes without onion or peas combination. also, it contains a strong flavour of garlic, ginger and coriander leaves. moreover, the patties are typically oval shaped as compared to round bonda’s. having said that, it is not mandatory and can be shaped to round and then later pressed while assembling it.

the vada pav recipe is extremely simple to prepare, yet i would like to add few tips and recommendations while preparing. firstly, ensure the boiled and mashed potatoes are moisture free and removed immediately from pressure cooker after it is cooked. if you feel you mashed potatoes contain moisture, fry them in a pan for 2-3 minutes to remove it. secondly, i have added baking soda to the besan batter to make vadas crisper. also, add 1 tbsp of rice flour/cornflour to make it even crisper. lastly, these vada pav should be served immediately after deep frying and assembling. alternatively, you can place the deep fried vadas in a preheated oven or even deep fry again for 1 minute if serving later.

finally, i request you to check my other street food recipes collection with this post of how to make vada pav recipe. it includes recipes like pav bhaji, misal pav, bhel puri, sev puri, aloo bonda, vegetable bonda, samosa chaat, dahi puri, aloo chaat and pani puri recipe. further, i request you to visit my other similar recipes collection like,


Easy Coconut Curry Sauce

If you’ve ever dumped curry powder into liquid then stomped your foot in a huff when you found the sauce to be meh, then this easy Coconut Curry Sauce is for you!

You’re going to absolutely love that you can find all the spices at supermarkets.

You’re going to adore the beautiful coconut flavour that mingles with the spices.

You’ll go bonkers over how it tastes like a full flavoured coconut Indian curry – except you made it in 30 minutes from scratch.

And you’re going to really enjoy lapping up all the compliments from your family and friends. (“OMG that’s the best curry I’ve ever had!!” <– True story, text from a friend)


Four sizzling sliders serve up burger nirvana

The only thing better than a truly great burger on a warm summer night is four of them.

That’s the beauty of a slider: The pint-size version of the American classic tucks a small, juicy patty and a plethora of condiment possibilities into a scaled-down bun. A slider leaves diners satisfied, gratified and ever so slightly virtuous, even as they reach for a second, third or — we won’t judge — fourth.

And for the decision-challenged, there’s no yea or nay about it. Sliders let you enjoy that chive-spiked chicken burger with lemon-pansy aioli and the herb butter-laced ground chuck with balsamic-marinated tomatoes. And the Bombay curry turkey burger with fresh ginger and cumin. And a black bean-black quinoa version, too.

Sliders offer so many ways to play with your food, you could just mix and match among categories — matching the black bean patties, say, with the curry aioli from their Bombay burger brethren.

So with that in mind, we took a dive into some of our favorite cookbooks of the past year or so and began mixing, matching and improvising with abandon. We’re typing this in a state of utter slider satiety — and the renewed realization that when Bon Appetit editor Adam Rapoport assembles the collected wisdom of that foodie mag into “The Ultimate Grilling Book: The Definitive Guide from Bon Appetit” (Andrews McMeel, $45 for print, $16.99 digital and $9.99 Kindle), there’s no hyperbole involved.

The top takeaways: Start with good-quality ingredients — butcher counter meat, not frozen chubs — and layer the flavors from the inside out. A simple ground-chuck slider turns meltingly tender when a small disc of lemon-herb butter is tucked inside the patty before it hits the grill. And that single building block — a compound butter that combines lemon zest with chopped fresh basil, tarragon and flat-leaf parsley — is divine on pretty much everything else, too, from grilled salmon to steamed vegetables.

And if you’ve struggled with less-than-impressive turkey or chicken burgers, both Rapoport’s team and Martha Stewart Living food editor Lucinda Scala Quinn have some simple advice: Use ground thigh meat, which has more flavor and fat content, so it’s less likely to dry out on the grill. And amp up the moisture factor from the inside out.

Bon Appetit’s Bombay Curry Slider adds mayonnaise, two tablespoons of fresh ginger and plenty of fresh herbs to the ground-turkey meat before grilling. Quinn, who says she was inspired by the addictive burgers from New York City’s Shake Shack when she created her Chive-Chicken Burgers, featured in her cookbook “Mad Hungry Cravings” (Artisan, $27.95 print, $18.95 digital and $9.99 Kindle), adds fresh breadcrumbs, Dijon mustard, fresh herbs and lemon juice to her patties before cooking.

Bruce Weinstein and Mark Scarborough use a similar trick with their whole-grain twist on the veggie burger theme, adding black quinoa, minced pickled jalapeños and generous lashings of barbecue sauce to the black bean patties in “Grain Mains” (Rodale, $24.99).

Then mix and match condiments, marrying the “special sauce” concept with adobo, for example, or getting fancy with aioli by adding fresh garlic and curry powder, or lemon zest, chives and edible blossoms. The latter may not fly at a tailgate, but they’ll wow at a bridal shower or luncheon. Add arugula and other greens to your lettuce roster. And frankly, balsamic-basil-marinated tomatoes complement pretty much everything.