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Rolled Omelette (L'Omelette Roulée) Recipe

Rolled Omelette (L'Omelette Roulée) Recipe

This omelette should be made in a seven-inch French omelette pan, and a gas flame is usually more successful than an electric stove.

The rolled omelette is the most fun of any method, but requires more practice. Here, the pan is jerked over high heat at an angle so that the egg mass is continually hurled against the far lip of the pan until the eggs thicken. Finally, as the pan is tilted further while it is being jerked, the eggs roll over at the far lip of the pan, forming an omelette shape.

A simpleminded but perfect way to master the movement is to practice outdoors with half a cupful of dried beans. As soon as you are able to make them flip over themselves in a group, you have the right feeling; but the actual omelette-making gesture is sharper and rougher.

You might want to try mastering this easier technique beforehand.

Click here to see Julia Child's Tomato-Filled Omelette recipe.

Click here to see her recipe for Pipérade.

Ingredients

  • 2 or 3 eggs
  • Big pinch of salt
  • Pinch of pepper
  • 1 tablespoon butter, plus more for serving

Tools:

  • French omelette pan, 7 inches in diameter at the bottom

Directions

Beat the eggs and seasonings in a mixing bowl for 20-30 seconds, until the whites and yolks are just blended.

Melt the butter in a pan over very high heat. As it melts, tilt the pan in all directions to film the sides. When you see that the foam has almost subsided in the pan and the butter is about to brown, pour in the eggs. Let the eggs settle in the pan for 2-3 seconds to form a film of coagulated egg in the bottom of the pan.

Grasp the handle of the pan with both hands, thumbs on top, and immediately begin jerking the pan vigorously and roughly toward you at an even, 20-degree angle over the heat, one jerk per second. After several jerks, the eggs will begin to thicken.* (A filling would go in at this point.)

Then increase the angle of the pan slightly, which will force the egg mass to roll over on itself with each jerk at the far lip of the pan.

As soon as the omelette has shaped up, hold it in the angle of the pan to brown the bottom a pale golden color, but only for 1-2 seconds (otherwise the eggs will overcook). The center of the omelette should remain soft and creamy. If the omelette has not formed neatly, push it with the back of your fork.

Turn the omelette onto a plate, rub the top with a bit of butter, and serve as soon as possible.


Tamagoyaki [Japanese Rolled Eggs or Omelette] Recipe

My first experience with Japanese cuisine was at a sushi bar in Atlanta, Georgia in 1993. From the first bite I was madly in love and I've been introducing people to sushi since that day! Japanese food is one of my favorites because it is minimal, clean, and delicious.

Traveling to other countries to enjoy the local cuisine is obviously the best way to gain an appreciation for the skills and various flavors each location has to offer. When you can't travel, why not explore other countries from home? Choose a few cookbooks, a documentary, and get ready to travel!

While my family enjoys traveling, it's not always possible, which is why we frequently traverse countries and cultures using our imagination. Today, let's explore a popular Japanese food that you can make at home.


The Most Opulent Rolled Omelet of Your Life

Matthew Accarrino, Executive Chef of San Francisco’s Michelin-starred SPQR, likes bridging his two passions: cooking and cycling. In April, he set up shop in New York City’s Chef Club, a restaurant with rotating chefs from around the world. One of the dishes he&aposs serving is an interpretation of his professional cycling team’s recovery meal of choice, a three-layered rolled omelet that resembles a Japanese tamago—only this one is topped with sea urchin, sturgeon roe, egg yolk purພ, and chives.

To create the dish, Accarrino makes three egg crepes with a mixture of eggs, white soy sauce, honey, and sea salt. Once the first crepe is cooked, it’s set to the side. Before the second is fully set, the first crepe is then layered on top of the loose egg so it sticks. To finish it off, this two-layered crepe is layered atop a third, making three separate layers. The final product is then rolled, wrapped in plastic, and placed in the fridge to set.

Usually when Accarrino serves this dish to cyclists, it’s “on top of rice with some greens. after a hard race for a recovery meal, but it worked it’s way into the restaurant topped with caviar and sea urchin as a luxury dish.”


L’Omelette Roulee (Rolled Omelette) #CookforJulia

I immediately responded with the egg episode! I loved how she took such a simple ingredient (eggs) and was able to turn it into an educational and and amusing program (honestly, they were all like that!)

When I put together my long list of dishes of what I wanted to make for my Julia Child week and half, her L’Omelette Roulee or rolled omelette was marked high on that list. You see, I have a confession – while I can make you a plate of beautiful, soft and succulent scramble eggs I almost always fail at omelette making. There is an art to making the perfect rolled omelette and I was determined, with Julia right by my side, to be successful!

Julia Child recommends a French omelette pan but a well seasoned cast iron or a non-stick pan will also work just as well. You need a pan that won't stick and the eggs can move along freely as they cook.


Omelette Roulée or Rolled Omelette

I’m so excited to have been chosen to be part of the JC100 celebrating 100 years of Julia Child. I grew up watching Julia Child on PBS because my Mom was a huge fan so it’s even more special to be able to be part of this program now that I’m a Mom myself. So, today I am sharing this omelette roulee which is one of Julia Child’s recipes.

Each week I hope to be able to share with you one of Julia Child’s recipes so that you can try it and I will also share my photograph of the finished recipe as well. The first recipe is the Omelette Roulee or Rolled Omelette.

We eat a lot of eggs at our house because we have our own ducks and chickens. During the spring, we always have more eggs than we know what to do with so this was perfect timing.

What is an omelette roulee?

This recipe comes from Julia’s cookbook Mastering the Art of French Cooking. It’s an easy omelet that is ready in only a few minutes. Unlike traditional omelets, the omelet is not usually stuffed.

The key is to shake the pan while making it to cause the omelet to roll over itself until it is sitting in one corner of the pan. If you plan on adding vegetables to yours, you will need to help it to roll over. It takes a while to perfect your omelet technique.

With a traditional diner-style omelet, you cook the egg until the center is almost set. Then, you add cheese, vegetables, and meat and fold it over carefully with a spatula. It takes longer to make. And, it can get tricky to fold over depending on what you add.

If you are looking for something decadent like a lobster omelette recipe, you can add lobster and your favorite cheese to this recipe if you like. Or, enjoy it plain.

I hope you have a chance to try Julia Child’s Omelet recipe. This post was originally published in 2012. Above is the original image of the final omelet. I hope to update it soon.

What do I need to make an omelette roulee?

This is probably one of the easiest omelet recipes you will ever make. You need:

And, probably most important, you will need a good omelet pan. Making an omelet in just any old pan really doesn’t work well. At least, it doesn’t work well for me.

What should I serve with this omelette roulee?

You can serve it with a salad if you plan on having this for lunch. Or, if this will be for breakfast, you can make bacon or sausage. This gluten-free bread recipe is one of my daughter’s favorite types of bread to toast. She loves spreading it with strawberry butter.

Original omelette roulee recipe excerpted from Mastering the Art of French Cooking by Julia Child. Copyright © 1961 by Alfred A. Knopf. Reprinted with permission from the publisher Alfred A. Knopf, a division of Random House, Inc.

More unique omelet recipes

If you enjoyed this omelette roulee you might want to try my IHOP Bacon Temptation Omelet. Or, you might want to learn how to make a frittata.


L’Omelette Roulée

†Excerpted from Mastering the art of French Cookingby Julia Child. Copyright ©1961 by Alfred A. Knopf. Reprinted with permission from the publisher Alfred A. Knopf, a division of Random House, Inc.

For one omelette, 1 to 2 servings. Time: Less than 30 seconds of cooking

  • 2 or 3 eggs
  • big pinch of salt
  • pinch of pepper
  • a mixing bowl
  • a table fork

Beat the eggs and seasonings in the mixing bowl for 20 to 30 seconds until the whites and yolks are just blended.

  • 1 tbsp butter
  • an omelette pan 7 inches in diameter at the bottom
  • a table fork

Place the butter in the pan and set over very high heat. As the butter melts, tilt the pan in all directions to film the sides. When you see that the foam has almost subsided in the pan and the butter is on the point of colouring (indicating it is hot enough), pour in the eggs. It is of utmost importance in this method that the butter be of the correct temperature.

Let the eggs settle in the pan for 2 or 3 seconds to form a film of coagulated egg in the bottom of the pan.

Grasp the handle of the pan with both hands, thumbs on top, and immediately begin jerking the pan vigorously and roughly toward you at an even, 20-degree angle over the heat, one jerk per second. It is the sharp pull of the pan toward you which throws the eggs against the far lip of the pan, then back over its bottom surface. You must have the courage to be rough or the eggs will not loosen themselves from the bottom of the pan. After several jerks, the eggs will begin to thicken. (A filling would go in at this point.)

Then increase the angle of the pan slightly, which will force the egg mass to roll over on itself with each jerk at the far lip of the pan. As soon as the omelette has shaped up, hold it in the angle of the pan to brown the bottom a pale golden colour, but only a second or two, for the eggs must not overcook. The centre of the omelette should remain soft and creamy. If the omelette has not formed neatly, push it with the back of your fork.

Turn the omelette onto the plate, rub the top with a bit of butter, and serve as soon as possible.

I was a little nervous getting started and could easily imagine myself jerking the pan and ending up with egg all over my face, but I followed Julia’s advice. I found the courage to be rough with it and it worked! First try!

I’m sure the omelette was tasty right out of the pan but I wanted mine stuffed so I prepared a filling of sautéed mushrooms, shallots and garlic ( before I started cooking the eggs).

Next I smothered it with cheesy, yummy Mornay sauce (also prepared beforehand), and then I finished it with mushroom slices and a sprinkle of parsley.

Omelette Fermière Farcie Aux Champignons

Yes, there is more than one way to make an omelette but Julia’s method yielded the most tender eggs I’ve ever tasted. This simple recipe combined with a practiced, professional technique will help you create a dish that is both elegant and delicious.


How to Make a French Rolled Omelet

Master the classic breakfast staple with this simple technique.

Perhaps better than anyone, chef Jacques Pépin understands the satisfaction of improving a familiar food through technique—no tricky ingredients or gimmicky technology required. His simple French Rolled Omelet method starts with beating eggs with fresh herbs (We like to use chopsticks, which mix the eggs without incorporating too much air, resulting in a more tender omelet. Bonus: Wooden chopsticks won’t scratch a nonstick skillet.) He then adds them to foaming butter in a nonstick skillet, where swirling and vigorous stirring result in small, delicate curds. A few seconds of undisturbed cooking solidifies the mixture just enough to roll, yielding a pale-yellow egg crêpe filled with gently scrambled eggs𠅊n ethereal, delicate entrພ worthy of pairing with a chilled glass of Champagne. Here’s how to make it in just a few minutes.


In a small bowl and using chopsticks, beat eggs until well combined and no visible traces of whites remain. Beat in the cooled dashi, mirin, and soy sauce.

Preheat tamagoyaki pan over medium-high heat until you can feel moderate heat radiating off it when your hand is held an inch or two from the surface (you want it just hot enough that the eggs will gently bubble and sizzle when they hit the pan, but not so hot that they rapidly brown). Holding your greased paper towel between a pair of chopsticks, rub the pan all over with a light coating of oil, including in all the corners (it helps to store the oiled towel nearby in a small dish during the cooking process).

Add one-quarter of the egg mixture to the pan, tilting the pan to spread the egg around in an even layer covering the bottom of the pan. Using your chopsticks, puncture any large bubbles that form.

When the egg has fully set on the bottom but is still slightly wet on top, begin your first roll: Lift the pan off the heat and try to slide one of your chopsticks under the far edge of the egg layer then, with a quick upward motion of the pan, lift and roll the egg sheet up and over itself so that it rolls partway toward the handle. Repeat, rolling the egg sheet up fully toward the handle. This is the most difficult layer to roll because the egg sheet is so floppy if you have trouble, don't worry, just use your chopsticks to push the egg sheet, bunching it up by the handle end.

Return the pan to the heat. Rub the oiled towel all over the exposed surface of the pan (this should be the middle and far side), then slide the omelette roll away from the handle to the far side of the pan and grease the area near the handle.

Add the next quarter of the egg mixture (you will make four layers in total), spreading it around the bottom of the pan. Using your chopsticks, lift the rolled portion up and let the raw egg run underneath it. Continue to cook, popping any large bubbles that form, until the new layer is just set and still wet on top.

Now repeat the rolling step as before, sliding a chopstick under the far edge and flopping the cooked egg log over itself as you roll it toward the handle. Repeat the layering and rolling process two more times until the egg is finished.

Turn the rolled tamagoyaki out onto a bamboo sushi mat, if desired, and roll it up tightly but gently (this helps set a uniform rolled shape, but isn't required) let stand 3 minutes. Transfer tamagoyaki to a serving plate, slice crosswise if desired, and serve with a small mound of grated daikon radish lightly drizzle some extra usukuchi soy sauce on the daikon mound, if desired.


INGREDIENTS

1/2 tsp black salt or table salt

1/2 cup chickpea flour (85g)

1/4 tsp baking powder (not soda, it won’t bubble if using soda)

a pinch of turmeric (A SMALL PINCH- YOU DON’T WANT FLUORESCENT YELLOW EGG)

Half a small carrot, finely diced (35g)

1 sprig of spring onion, finely diced


What to Serve with Tamagoyaki

Tamagoyaki is really a versatile side, but I think it is extra special when enjoyed in a traditional Japanese-style breakfast. If you’re up for a hearty Japanese breakfast, try it on a weekend! Here are some ideas to serve tamogoyaki with:

Of course, all these dishes can be prepared ahead of time, so you’re not spending the whole morning cooking everything at once.

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Watch the video: Gerolltes Omelette mit Schinken und Käse - Rolled omelette with ham and cheese (January 2022).