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This Peeling Trick Makes Potatoes Taste Better

This Peeling Trick Makes Potatoes Taste Better

Improve your spuds with this easy tip.

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Green beans were often a staple of our regular Sunday suppers at my Granny's house, but the simple addition of the little potatoes with the skin peeled off in the middle was saved for holidays and special occasions. The green beans and potatoes were cooked in flavored chicken stock, and the potatoes would fall apart just enough to coat the beans with starchy goodness (vegetable stock works great, too, if you want to make the dish vegetarian.) We peel the strip off for a couple of reasons: It looks nice, and it helps the potatoes release more starch.

The green beans and potatoes still live on in our yearly menu, only now it's my nieces and nephews who cook it. The dish is just as simple and just as delicious as it was when I had it at Granny's table, and it's still the one thing that officially tells my taste buds that it's a special occasion.

Eating healthy should still be delicious.

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View the Recipe: Southern Green Beans and Potatoes

For precise potato peeling, we love OXO Good Grips swivel peeler (Amazon, $7.64). If you don't trust our recommendation, the peeler has a five-star rating from over 2,000 Amazon customers, so you know it's gotta be good.


The 7 Biggest Mistakes You Make When Baking Potatoes

Baked potatoes sit atop the mountain of comfort foods. With a fluffy, melt-in-your-mouth interior and a crispy, salty skin, a perfect baked potato is a thing of beauty.

But for many people, the dream of the ideal oven-baked potato sits just out of reach. What should seem easy — baking a potato in a hot oven — can, and often does, return mixed results: gummy centers, slightly charred skins, or slippery, soggy skins.

No one will say they&aposre not edible, but could they be better? Yes. And if the steps to make them better are remarkably easy, there&aposs no reason to suffer sad, shriveled baked potatoes anymore.

Read on to see if you&aposre committing the 7 deadly sins against baked potatoes, and learn simple tips you can follow to make your next batch of oven-baked potatoes perfect.

1. You don't dry the potato well.

You should certainly rinse the potatoes — we prefer russets — to remove any dirt and debris. You can even give them a quick scrub with a vegetable brush. But you need to dry the spuds well after the bath. Excess moisture on the skin can seep into the potato during baking and cause soggy skins.

Do be sure to prick a few holes into the skin, too. While the potato is unlikely to explode in the oven, no one is here to take risks with dinner. Err on the side of caution.

2. You wrap the potato in foil.

Don&apost be ashamed if you do this — many cooks believe it to be the key to the perfect baked potato. But turns out you&aposre ruining the skin if you do this.

The ideal baked potato skin relies on a certain amount of dehydration and rehydration — we&aposll get to that. If you bake in foil, all the moisture from the potato just circles back into the potato skin, which can leave you with a sad state of skin.

No, once you&aposve washed and dried the potatoes, leave them be. No wrapping.

3. You don't use a wire rack under the potatoes.

Potatoes need to cook all the way through, and the best way for that to happen is to make sure the hot air can get to the potato from all sides. If a potato bakes with one side touching a sheet pan, you&aposll get a hard spot and possibly uneven cooking.

Place a thin wire rack inside a rimmed baking sheet. Line up your spuds, side by side, and place the pan into the oven. Make sure there&aposs a little room between each potato before closing the oven door.

4. The oven is too hot.

Low and slow—that&aposs the mantra of the Perfect Baked Potato. If you&aposve got the time to spare, cook the potatoes at 300ଏ for 90 minutes. If you need to speed that up, bump it to 450ଏ for 45 minutes. (Note: Your baking time will vary depending on the size of your potato and how hot your oven runs.)

But don&apost go hotter than that. There&aposs no victory in cooking potatoes at a temp greater than 450ଏ. They might be done a bit faster, but the high heat temp will leave you with overly browned skins that might even char in spots. And since the whole point of a perfectly baked potato is to have skins as delicious as the fluffy interior, there&aposs no charring allowed.

5. You don't take the potatoes' temperature.

You know when meat is perfectly cooked by measuring the internal temperature the same is true for baked potatoes. Use a probe thermometer to measure the temp of your potatoes. You&aposre aiming for a temp in the sweet spot between 205ଏ and 212ଏ. Below that, the texture may still be too dense, and above that, it may become a gummy mess.

6. You baste first, not last.

Skip rubbing your potatoes in oil and salt until the end of the cooking time. That&aposs when they&aposll deliver the most texture and flavor benefit for the spuds. If you oil them up early, the skins may not turn crispy. The salt, too, can run off the potatoes in the heat.

Instead, do a quick oil baste after the potatoes reach 205ଏ: Remove the pan from the oven. Brush with olive oil (or bacon grease if you have it) and a hefty sprinkle of kosher salt.

Return the pan to the oven for 10 minutes — the temperatures of the potatoes won&apost climb more than 2 or 3 degrees in that time. The oil will crisp up the skins that were dehydrated during the long bake, and the salt will add delectable flavor.

7. You let the potatoes cool before cutting.

Unlike meat, potatoes don&apost get better by resting. They need to be sliced open immediately. If you don&apost, they will retain water from the still-steaming center and turn dense and gummy.

Quickly jab a serrated knife through each potato as soon as the pan has cleared the oven. Give them a gentle squeeze (with a hot-temp glove or towel) to create a vent.

Then you can gather all your fixings and call the family to the table. The potatoes will have cooled just enough by the time everyone gathers around to enjoy dinner — and marvel at your perfectly baked potatoes.


Gluey mashed potatoes

Let's get started with one of the most luscious ways to prepare the humble potato — mashed potatoes. Mashed potatoes are likely where you're making your most grievous errors. First, a starchy variety is going to produce the fluffy consistency you're after, so go for a russet or even a richly-flavored all-purpose variety like a Yukon. Start your potatoes in a pot of cold water, and then crank up the heat. Once the water begins to boil, you want to salt it up well, or else your potatoes will taste woefully under-seasoned.

Once the potatoes can be pierced through easily, drain off the water, return them to their hot pan, and begin to add your other ingredients — which you should heat in a separate pan before adding. Gently mash or whisk the potatoes until they're just where you want them — but don't overwork them, or you'll get a gluey, unappetizing texture.

One more rule: Don't use a food processor — it will overwork your potatoes. A regular masher or whisk is all you need, though they'll be terrifically smooth if you process the cooked spuds with a ricer or food mill. For super creamy mashed potatoes, try mixing them using the whisk attachment of your stand mixer. I do this every Thanksgiving with loads of heavy cream and butter, and they are deliciously decadent.


Egg-Peeling Trick: Spoon

  • Peeling time, recently cooked eggs: 22 seconds (steamed) 23 seconds (boiled)
  • Peeling time, aged eggs: 22 seconds (steamed) 22 seconds (boiled)
  • Rating: 4/10

About This Method: In a cool YouTube video titled “How to Peel an Egg in Under 10 Seconds,” the host demonstrates this technique. You start by tapping the wider base of the egg on the counter and peeling away about a quarter-sized spot of shell. You then insert the tip of a teaspoon into the opening, between the shell and egg, and rotate the spoon around the egg, working it down and around the egg until the shell comes off in one piece.

Results: First of all, it took longer than the 10 seconds the video touted. When you watch, you’ll see that it takes 10 seconds alone just to peel the quarter-sized spot of shell before you insert the spoon. But that’s OK, as 22 seconds is still pretty quick to peel an egg, and the timing was consistent for the recently cooked eggs and the aged eggs. The problem with this method is that with about half of the eggs, the spoon peeled away a layer of egg white as I moved it around the egg. Not only does this waste a bit of food, but it also makes for a pretty unattractive presentation.

My Takeaway: I’m just not sold on this method. About half of the time, it worked pretty well (meaning it didn’t cut into the egg), but it seemed like more fuss than it was worth — especially compared to the other methods I tested.


How to Make the Best Mashed Potatoes

What Are the Best Potatoes for Mashed Potatoes?

For this basic recipe, we used a blend of red and russet potatoes. This combination creates a slight texture variation. If you prefer completely smooth mashed potatoes, this method still applies, but russet or Yukon Gold potatoes — with their high starch content — are the best choices for mashed potatoes.

Related: Find out how to choose the right potatoes for your recipe.

Mashed Potato Ingredients

Instructions

1. Peel the potatoes, removing as many of the eyes as possible with the tip of your peeler. (If you prefer more rustic-looking mashed potatoes, keep the skin on half of them and mash them with a potato masher instead of a food mill or potato ricer.)

2. Submerge the potatoes in a bowl of cold water to keep them from turning brown while you are chopping them.

3. Cut the potatoes into similar-sized chunks so they will cook evenly: the cubes should be about 1½ to two inches wide.

4. Put the cut potatoes in a large pot. Use a pot large enough to hold the potatoes with enough water to cover, plus room for the water to boil up without boiling over. Add salt to the water, if desired. Bring the water to a boil over high heat, then reduce heat to medium low.

5. Cover the pot and simmer until potatoes are tender —ꂫout 15 to 20 minutes. A knife tip inserted into a potato should meet no resistance if the potato clings to the knife, the potatoes need to cook longer. When potatoes are done, remove from heat and drain immediately.

Reserve the potato water if you would like to use it in place of butter or cream when mashing, or if you plan to make a vegetable soup stock or sourdough bread:

6. Return the drained potatoes to the pot and heat over medium-high heat for about a minute to cook off any excess water. This guarantees your mashed potatoes won&apost be watery. Stir gently to make sure all the potatoes dry out. The edges will start to look white and flaky, but don&apost let the potatoes scorch. Meanwhile, heat the butter and cream in a small saucepan at a low temperature. (You can also use the microwave for this step.)

7. Now we get to the mashing part. For this recipe, we used a food mill to break up the potatoes and remove any lumps. Once the potatoes have been passed through the mill, drizzle half of your hot cream mixture through and around the grate to get every last bit of potato. Gently stir in the remaining butter and cream.

8. Taste the potatoes for seasoning and adjust to taste. Test for consistency, too: If the potatoes are too thick, add more cream. Other herbs and spices can be added at this point as well: chopped chives, Italian parsley, Parmesan cheese, crumbled bacon, roasted garlic, chopped scallions, or creamed leeks are all delicious additions.


Results

Faff factor
The least faffy of the four, as you might expect. Delia has you put the oven tray of hot fat onto the heat as you baste the potatoes, which seals them well. (Everyone else might already do this, but I haven't before. I think it makes a difference). She says this means you don't need to turn them. I would recommend ignoring that and giving them a shake halfway through

Potato factor
Good potatoes, but we found them a little less golden than might be desired, and a bit greasier than the ideal roastie. But in terms of fluffy outsides and in: 10 minutes parboiling might be optimum before shaking – fluffy enough so they pick up all the fat (see Nigella), but not so they fall apart (Heston)

Variety factor
Desiree: Delia's favourite for her roasties, and A agreed with her. My problem? A Desiree stays just a little bit too firm for me. I want more fluff inside
King Edward: Not a complete disaster, but almost. The insides were too
floury and the potatoes seemed to have absorbed a lot of the oil
flavour – and not in a great way.
Maris Piper: These however, made up for the Edwards: the perfect crisp, with a lovely crunch collapsing into fluffy, creamy insides. Tastes like a roast potato, with good balance of oil vs pots.

Verdict
A bit patchy. And neither of us were overkeen on the lard, even though we didn't use much of it. But the Maris Pipers were a treat.


What are the best potatoes to use?

I use thin-skinned potatoes like creamers (or baby potatoes) or Yukon Gold. Small yellow, white, or red potatoes are perfect. They are quick to cook and make the best skin-on mashed potatoes! We are usually short on time, so the smaller potatoes allow us to skip peeling and just slice in half or quarters. (We use the same varieties of potatoes to make this crispy oven roasted potato recipe!)

They are also creamier than more starchy potatoes, like russet potatoes. So if you love creamy mashed potatoes, choose one of the small, thin-skinned varieties.

If you love fluffy mashed potatoes, use starchy potatoes (like Russet or Idaho) or for a combination of fluffy and creamy, use both waxy potatoes (like Red Bliss or baby potatoes) and starchy potatoes.

Adam and I go back and forth about peeling the potatoes. Adam loves keeping the skins on and I prefer when the potatoes are peeled. It’s safe to say that whether or not our potatoes are peeled depends on who’s making them.


How to Make Instant Mashed Potatoes Taste Homemade

Mashed potatoes are suitable for just about any season, not just the holidays. When you have hours to dedicate to peeling, boiling, and tirelessly mashing potatoes into a beautiful golden heap, they are absolute heaven.

But for the average weeknight when you’re just trying to get a dish on the table that the whole family will enjoy, it’s boxed mashed potatoes to the rescue. Not to steal the Campbell’s tagline here, but this pantry staple is for “real, real life.”

Just because you’re leaning on this time-saving technique doesn’t mean your mashed potatoes can’t taste freshly mashed. The box instructions will suggest adding butter for extra flavor, but we recommend jazzing up the dish even further with a few easy add-ins. With these tricks, your family will think they’re being treated to Thanksgiving Day potatoes on an average Wednesday night.

The best box for the job

Potato flakes are the perfect shelf-stable food to live in your pantry year-round. They’re made from russet potatoes that have been boiled, mashed, and then dehydrated to create flakes. For these methods, start with plain ol’ unflavored potato flakes that don’t have butter or salt in the ingredients list. You’ll be adding those elements in yourself and will have much more control over the final product this way.

Know your liquids

To really mimic the consistency of homemade mashed potatoes, thickness is key. Those dreaded soupy mashed potatoes you find at most cafeterias aren’t fooling anyone. It’s all about the ratio of liquids to potato flakes, so if you aren’t satisfied with the final texture, feel free to add another spoonful of flakes.

On the package instructions, you’ll see that most recipes start with boiling water. Instead of water, sub in chicken or vegetable broth. Sticking to the same measurements, heat the liquid with a little salt and a few tablespoons of butter just long enough to boil, then remove from the heat.

The box will then tell you to stir in cold milk with the potato flakes, but we suggest opting for sour cream, Greek yogurt, or buttermilk in the milk’s place. This will add an extra tang as well as a delicious creaminess. Stir in your cold, creamy element and potato flakes with a fork just until all the ingredients are moistened. Let the mixture sit for one or two minutes, then stir again with a fork. For even more flavor and thickness, stir in a few tablespoons of mascarpone or cream cheese while the mixture is still warm.

What about the lumps?

If you miss the lumps and uneven consistency that homemade mashed potatoes usually offer, there are still ways to imitate that texture in your boxed variation. And you don’t have to start from the beginning of the process.

Grab some canned new potatoes at the store when you shop for potato flakes. After draining and rinsing the canned potatoes, then boiling them with milk for about a minute, they can be mashed and stirred in with minimal effort. Voila! A lumpy texture without all the strenuous mashing.

The finishing touches

At this point, revert to the traditional mashed potato toppings you know and love. Herbs like chives and parsley are easy to stir in or sprinkle on top for color and freshness, while bacon bits add a savory, salty bite. Add in a flavorful cheese like blue or gouda, or roast a few cloves of garlic to mash in.

If you love a browned crust, finish off the dish in a casserole pan with a layer of melty cheese and breadcrumbs on top, popping it under the broiler for 3-5 minutes before serving.

Mashed potatoes are a blank slate just waiting for a new flavor profile. Get creative with new seasonings like fresh basil, hot sauce, or ranch powder. The possibilities of boxed mashed potatoes are endless because this is one easy dinner dish that will never go out of style.


If you didn&apost know already, potato peels should never be put in a garbage disposal system - their starchiness turns them into glue and can seriously clog things up. Don&apost even try unless you like paying expensive plumber&aposs fees.

Your best bet is to add them to a compost pile. Lots of people think that potato peels should never be composted because they will sprout. This isn&apost an issue, though. The peelings are thin enough and the temperature in the compost heap is hot enough to decompose them quickly.

Worms also love the delicious decomposed matter that results from potato peelings, so feel free to add them to your worm farm ( starting a worm farm is easy and a great educational activity for kids).


Michelin-starred chefs share 7 easy potato dishes you can make that aren't french fries

Insider asked Michelin-starred chefs to share their favorite recipe with potatoes.

Pommes fondant will transport you to France, while tortilla Española will make you dream of Spain.

Chefs also gave us their tips and tricks for making the best potato salad and hash browns.

Take your traditional potato salad up a notch by first cooking your spuds in hot chicken broth.

Curtis Stone, who runs Maude and Gwen in Los Angeles, told Insider that this trick takes his favorite potato salad from "everyday to extra special."

"I think of this salad as a bit of a wingman because I take it everywhere with me," he said. "It never fails me at picnics, barbecues, or at my own dinner table."

To make Stone's potato salad for eight, you'll need: 4 pounds of Yukon gold potatoes (peeled, cut into 1 ½-inch chunks), 8 ounces bacon (finely diced), 1 ½ cups low-sodium chicken broth, 2 medium shallots (finely chopped), ⅓ cup cornichons (finely chopped), ¼ cup drained capers, ¼ cup fresh flat-leaf parsley (finely chopped), and ⅓ cup aioli or mayonnaise.

Begin by placing your potatoes in a large saucepan of salted water. Bring the water to a boil over medium-high heat and boil your potatoes for about 10 minutes, until they're just tender.

While your potatoes are boiling, cook your bacon over medium-high heat in a large nonstick skillet for about six minutes, until they're crispy and golden brown. Transfer the bacon to a plate lined with paper towels.

Then, in a small saucepan, bring the chicken broth to simmer over high heat. Add your shallots, cornichons, and capers. Reduce the heat to medium-low and simmer very gently for two to three minutes, until the shallots soften slightly. Remove from heat.

Drain the potatoes in a colander and gently shake them to release any excess moisture. Transfer the potatoes to a large bowl. Add one-third of the broth mixture to your hot potatoes and, using a silicone spatula, gently fold and turn the potatoes in the hot broth for about two minutes — until most of it has been absorbed. Repeat two more times, adding just enough of the broth to moisten. The potatoes should break down a bit.

Gently fold the bacon and parsley into the warm potatoes, then gently fold in the aioli or mayonnaise. Season to taste with salt and black pepper. Stone said you can serve the salad warm, at room temperature, or chilled.

Pommes fondant may sound fancy, but this simple dish only takes 10 minutes of prep.

Stone loves using this classic French cooking technique — also known as fondant potatoes — when he's craving taters.

To make Stone's version of fondant potatoes for two, you'll need: 1 large Russet potato, ¼ cup chicken stock, 80 grams unsalted butter, 2 tablespoons grapeseed oil, 2 thyme sprigs, 1 rosemary sprig, and 1 garlic clove (peeled, smashed).

First, trim the sides off the potato to give it a square shape. Cut your trimmed potato lengthways into 3-centimeter-thick slabs, then create potato rounds from the slabs.

Heat your oil over medium-high heat in a small saucepan. Season potato rounds with salt and add them to the pan. Cook the potatoes for about four minutes, until their undersides have turned golden brown.

Turn your potatoes over and add the butter, stock, thyme, rosemary, and garlic. Cover the potatoes in the pan with parchment paper and reduce the heat to a simmer.

Cook your potatoes for 25 minutes, until they're tender. Keep the fondant potatoes warm until you're ready to serve.

A tortilla Española will transport you to Spain at any time of day.

Chris Morgan, who runs Bammy's in Washington, DC, told Insider that tortilla Española is his favorite potato dish "without a doubt."

"Tortilla Española is classically eaten throughout the day," he said. "It's a fun Spanish recipe that you can adapt, and there are fun ways to up the ante with chorizo or different cheeses."

Morgan loves going the classic route. To make his version of tortilla Española, you just need: 4 large Idaho potatoes (peeled and cut into ⅛-inch slices), 4 large eggs, 1 large onion (julienned), and ¾ cup extra-virgin olive oil.

First, heat your olive oil in a sauté pan (Morgan recommends using a nonstick pan) and throw in your potato slices one at a time so they don't stick together. Add your onion on top of the potatoes and slowly cook everything over medium heat, turning the potatoes and onions so they don't burn. Cook until they're just tender.

Drain the oil, saving it for later, and set your potato and onion mixture aside. Wipe out the pan.

Whisk your eggs in a separate bowl until they turn frothy. Add the potato and onions and mix until they're well-coated. Allow to sit for 20 minutes.

Add three tablespoons of the reserved oil to your sauté pan and heat until it just starts to smoke. Throw in your egg and potato mixture and spread so that it forms an even layer in the pan. Lower the heat to medium and shake the pan often to prevent it from sticking.

When the eggs and edges are noticeably beginning to brown underneath, flip the tortilla onto a plate. Add one more tablespoon of your reserved oil to the sauté pan and slide the tortilla back into the pan, cooking the other side for three to four minutes.

Flip the tortilla two more times to help with even cooking and shaping the edges. Remove from the pan and cut into wedges.

Or get your potato fix by serving them in the rösti style inspired by Switzerland.

"In Switzerland, rösti means 'crisp and golden,'" Chef Patrick O'Connell, who runs The Inn at Little Washington, explained to Insider. "The word has become synonymous with the country's famous potato cake."

O'Connell, whose three-star restaurant was also recently awarded the Green Michelin Star for sustainability, loves serving his rösti potatoes with smoked salmon and scrambled eggs for brunch.

"The potato cake makes a delicious cushion for ribbons of smoked salmon and lightly scrambled eggs," he said. "This dish is a lighter and more interesting brunch dish than the usual eggs Benedict."

To make O'Connell's rösti potatoes for six, you'll need: 2 large Idaho potatoes, ½ cup clarified butter, 12 eggs, 12 slices smoked salmon, 5 tablespoons crème fraîche, 2 teaspoons capers, 2 teaspoons red onion (finely diced), 2 teaspoons fresh chives (finely chopped), 2 teaspoons fresh dill (chopped).

Begin by peeling the potatoes and steaming them for 15 minutes. Let them cool, then use a box grater to shred the potatoes. Season the shredded potatoes with salt and white pepper and shape them into six cakes.

In a large skillet, heat half of your butter over medium heat. Place three of the cakes into the skillet and cook them for about five to seven minutes per side. Remove and drain them on paper towels. Repeat the step for the remaining cakes.

To make the scrambled eggs, first whisk your eggs together with 3 tablespoons of the crème fraîche, along with salt and pepper, in a stainless-steel bowl. Then place the bowl over a simmering pot of water, stirring and folding the eggs with a rubber spatula until they're very lightly scrambled.

To serve, place one of your rösti potatoes in the center of each plate. Add two slices of salmon on top, as well as a spoonful of scrambled eggs and a small dollop of crème fraîche. Top everything off with your capers, red onion, chives, and dill.

These Japanese sweet potatoes with a creamy Italian dressing could be a standout side dish, or the star of the dinner table.

"This is definitely our favorite potato recipe, and one of our favorite dishes in general!" Angie Rito and Scott Tacinello, the husband-and-wife team behind Don Angie, told Insider. "We love that the tangy creamy Italian dressing and sumac spice mix both offer acidity to balance the sweetness of the potatoes. The Parmesan and chives add even more savoriness, resulting in a very craveable dish."

To make the Japanese sweet potatoes for six, you'll need: 4 medium Japanese sweet potatoes (scrubbed clean), 2 heads of garlic (sliced in half horizontally), and Kosher salt.

First, place your potatoes and garlic in a large pot and cover with cool water by an inch. Heavily season it with salt ("like seawater") and bring it to a simmer over medium heat. Cook the potatoes for 25 to 30 minutes, until they're fork-tender. Drain the potatoes and set them aside until they're cool enough to handle but still warm.

Then, with a fork, gently break the potato apart into rustic pieces about 1 ½ to 2-inches in size. Add the pieces to a large mixing bowl and toss with 1 cup of potato starch, evenly coating all slides.

"It's important that the potatoes are still warm at this point. The residual heat helps the starch adhere and activates it," Rito and Tacinello told Insider. "This step ensures a very crisp outer coating when you fry the potatoes."

Arrange the potatoes in a single layer on a sheet tray or large plate and place them in the refrigerator to chill for 45-60 minutes.

While your potatoes are cooling, make the spice mixture: Add 2 tablespoons granulated onion, 2 tablespoons granulated garlic, 2 tablespoons kosher salt, 2 tablespoons sugar, 1 tablespoon sumac, and ½ teaspoon dried oregano into a small bowl and whisk everything together until they're evenly combined. Set aside.

You can also make the dressing. Throw ⅓ cup creme fraîche, ¾ cup Kewpie mayonnaise, ¼ cup white wine vinegar, ⅓ cup coarsely grated Parmesan (preferably Parmigiano-Reggiano), 1 tablespoon garlic powder, 1 tablespoon onion powder, 1 ½ teaspoons dried oregano, 2 teaspoons sugar, 1 teaspoon kosher salt, ½ teaspoon black pepper, and ¼ cup of water all into a blender. Mix on high for 30 seconds, until they're well-combined.

Then, with the blender running on slow, slowly drizzle in ⅓ cup extra-virgin olive oil and ½ cup neutral oil (such as vegetable) for about 20 seconds, until they're well-incorporated. Set aside.

To fry your potatoes, first heat 8 cups of neutral oil in a large heavy-bottomed pot or Dutch oven over medium-high heat until it reaches about 360 degrees Fahrenheit. Then, working in batches to avoid overcrowding, fry your potatoes for 3-4 minutes, until they're golden brown and crispy. Set them in a large mixing bowl and toss with half of the spice mixture. Repeat the process until all your potatoes are fried and spiced.

Arrange your seasoned potatoes on a serving platter and drizzle with one cup of the dressing, putting the rest in a small side bowl for dipping. Garnish your potatoes with additional Parmesan and chives.

Pro tip: If you want to skip the hassle of frying, Rito and Tacinello said you can achieve a similar (but less crispy) result by cubing your potatoes, tossing them in olive oil, and roasting them in the oven for about an hour at 350 degrees Fahrenheit.

Elevate your morning hash browns with some chives and Parmesan.

"I love a good crispy hash brown, where the outside is nice and golden-brown and the inside is soft," Soo Ahn, chef of the soon-to-be-open Adalina in Chicago, told Insider. "That's why I love hash browns that have been cooked on both sides to give that greater ratio of crispiness to tenderness."

To make Ahn's hash browns, you'll need: 2 peeled potatoes, 6 tablespoons bacon fat, 4 tablespoons grated parmesan cheese, and 2 tablespoons chives (chopped).

First, grate your peeled potatoes and wring out all the excess moisture. Then, pour some of the bacon fat into a pan and turn the heat up to medium-high.

Add your grated potatoes to the pan and season with salt and pepper. After about five to six minutes, once your potatoes are crispy and brown, flip them over and cook for another five to six minutes.

Finish off your hash browns with parmesan and chives. Breakfast is served!

Or skip your usual pancakes for a Korean potato pancake instead.

Suyoung Park, the executive chef of Jungsik in Manhattan, told Insider that this is her favorite recipe with potatoes.

"It's so savory and crispy, and it has a similar taste to a hash brown," she added. "It's very easy and simple — that's the way Korean people love it!"

To make Park's potato pancakes at home, you'll need: 2 medium potatoes (peeled, thinly sliced), ½ medium onion (peeled, thinly sliced), 1 green chili (seeded, thinly sliced), and ¼ carrot (thinly sliced).

Begin by julienning your potatoes and soaking them in cold water for at least five minutes. Park said this step is essential for removing the starch from the potatoes. Then dry them with a kitchen towel.

Mix your green chili, onion, and carrot with ½ teaspoon of salt, 2 tablespoons of flour, and 1 tablespoon of the potato starch. Add your potatoes to the mixture.

Place a pan on medium heat and add plenty of cooking oil. Spread your potato slices onto the pan and cook until they're browned, making sure to turn it over and cook the other side as well.

Park recommends serving your Korean potato pancakes with soy pickles or an easy dipping sauce — just mix equal parts soy sauce, vinegar, water, sugar, and chili powder.


These Japanese sweet potatoes with a creamy Italian dressing could be a standout side dish, or the star of the dinner table.

"This is definitely our favorite potato recipe, and one of our favorite dishes in general!" Angie Rito and Scott Tacinello, the husband-and-wife team behind Don Angie, told Insider. "We love that the tangy creamy Italian dressing and sumac spice mix both offer acidity to balance the sweetness of the potatoes. The Parmesan and chives add even more savoriness, resulting in a very craveable dish."

To make the Japanese sweet potatoes for six, you'll need: 4 medium Japanese sweet potatoes (scrubbed clean), 2 heads of garlic (sliced in half horizontally), and Kosher salt.

First, place your potatoes and garlic in a large pot and cover with cool water by an inch. Heavily season it with salt ("like seawater") and bring it to a simmer over medium heat. Cook the potatoes for 25 to 30 minutes, until they're fork-tender. Drain the potatoes and set them aside until they're cool enough to handle but still warm.

Then, with a fork, gently break the potato apart into rustic pieces about 1 ½ to 2-inches in size. Add the pieces to a large mixing bowl and toss with 1 cup of potato starch, evenly coating all slides.

"It's important that the potatoes are still warm at this point. The residual heat helps the starch adhere and activates it," Rito and Tacinello told Insider. "This step ensures a very crisp outer coating when you fry the potatoes."

Arrange the potatoes in a single layer on a sheet tray or large plate and place them in the refrigerator to chill for 45-60 minutes.

While your potatoes are cooling, make the spice mixture: Add 2 tablespoons granulated onion, 2 tablespoons granulated garlic, 2 tablespoons kosher salt, 2 tablespoons sugar, 1 tablespoon sumac, and ½ teaspoon dried oregano into a small bowl and whisk everything together until they're evenly combined. Set aside.

You can also make the dressing. Throw ⅓ cup creme fraîche, ¾ cup Kewpie mayonnaise, ¼ cup white wine vinegar, ⅓ cup coarsely grated Parmesan (preferably Parmigiano-Reggiano), 1 tablespoon garlic powder, 1 tablespoon onion powder, 1 ½ teaspoons dried oregano, 2 teaspoons sugar, 1 teaspoon kosher salt, ½ teaspoon black pepper, and ¼ cup of water all into a blender. Mix on high for 30 seconds, until they're well-combined.

Then, with the blender running on slow, slowly drizzle in ⅓ cup extra-virgin olive oil and ½ cup neutral oil (such as vegetable) for about 20 seconds, until they're well-incorporated. Set aside.

To fry your potatoes, first heat 8 cups of neutral oil in a large heavy-bottomed pot or Dutch oven over medium-high heat until it reaches about 360 degrees Fahrenheit. Then, working in batches to avoid overcrowding, fry your potatoes for 3-4 minutes, until they're golden brown and crispy. Set them in a large mixing bowl and toss with half of the spice mixture. Repeat the process until all your potatoes are fried and spiced.

Arrange your seasoned potatoes on a serving platter and drizzle with one cup of the dressing, putting the rest in a small side bowl for dipping. Garnish your potatoes with additional Parmesan and chives.

Pro tip: If you want to skip the hassle of frying, Rito and Tacinello said you can achieve a similar (but less crispy) result by cubing your potatoes, tossing them in olive oil, and roasting them in the oven for about an hour at 350 degrees Fahrenheit.