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Come and Get it with the Culinary Content Network Slideshow

Come and Get it with the Culinary Content Network Slideshow

Diabetic Foodie — Packable Lunches for Kids and Adults

Diabetic Foodie was started in January of 2010, by Shelby Kinnaird, "a type 2 diabetic who loves to eat." With a set of rules dictating their food philosophy, Diabetic Foodie’s recipes will always contain nutritional information and will always be from a community of posters. In this post, Diabetic Foodie shares lunch tips — what to pack for kids and adults.

Hungry Happenings — Serve Basketball-Themed Food While You Watch the NCAA Finals

Hungry Happenings is a blog of festive food for special occasions. In this post, blogger Beth gets into March Madness, creating basketball-themed treats to keep in mind for your future sporting occasions.

Cherry on My Sundae — Three Cheese, Prosciutto, Salami, and Spinach Stromboli

Cherry on My Sundae sources recipes on the Internet, and then adjusts, improves, tweaks, and adds her personal touch, making sure to clarify steps and simplify complicated processes for readers, and advises that her blog is in place to do the same thing — to get you started so you can take and then make them your own! In this post, Cherry on My Sundae gives a savory recipe for a prosciutto stromboli.

Culinary Connectors — Where to Drink This Week: Denver – Lincoln’s Roadhouse

Culinary Connectors was launched in November of 2008, with a mission to educate and share the culinary talent of Colorado, by way of highlighting its restaurants, shops, chefs, farmers, and producers. Here, Culinary Connectors brings us a spotlight on where to drink this week in Denver — Lincoln’s Roadhouse.

The Family Feed — Dark Chocolate Buttermilk Waffle Cake

The Family Feed is all about what you put in your body — "you put good things in and good things happen." The Family Feed aims to share their cooking and baking talents, along with writing, photos, recipes, and more, for their kids and others. In this post, The Family Feed shares an unbelievable four-layer waffle cake, and shows how you can recreate it.

Http://thefamilyfeed.com/2013/04/10/dark-chocolate-buttermilk-waffle-cake/

Dinners, Dishes & Desserts is a blog by a family-oriented Colorado mom with a desire to share her recipes and try new things. Here, this Colorado mom whips up a West Coast favorite, puppy chow, and shows you how to make bars of its delectable sweetness.

The Food Charlatan — Lamb Meatball Gyros

The Food Charlatan is a blog by Karen, a dessert-loving and food-obsessed mom who fears the day when her metabolism slows, the calories catch up with her, and you see her "rolling down the street in jogging shorts." Here, she wows us with a recipe, and photos, of lamb meatball gyros.

Bite and Booze — Prichard's Double Chocolate Bourbon Whiskey: Whisk(e)y Wednesday Presented by Calandro's Supermarket

Bite and Booze is on a quest to celebrate the food and beverage culture of Louisiana, and everywhere author Jay D. Ducote eats and drinks. Here, Bite and Booze talks about Prichard’s double chocolate bourbon whiskey.

Bella Vivere — Review: Chai Pani (Decatur, Ga.)

Bella Vivere is all about restaurant news. In this post, Bella Vivere reviews Chai Pani, which translates to "tea and water," slang in India for going out for a cup of tea and a snack.


How To&hellipRoast Garlic

In this post, I&rsquoll be covering the step of roasting garlic. It&rsquos a very simple skill and I&rsquom sure many of you have down pat, but for those of you who don&rsquot roast garlic on a regular basis, TRUST ME: you&rsquore wandering around in a culinary void. And the only thing in the universe that will fill the void and turn you into the whole, well-rounded person your grandmother intended you to be is roasted garlic. The flavor is&hellipwell, there&rsquos nothing like it on earth.

The first thing you need to do is grab a bunch of heads of garlic. Try not to buy them too small. Then, cut off just enough of the top to expose all of the cloves inside.

Next, find one of your oldest, dearest pie pans. I like this one best, especially because it still has the remnants of an old burned pie along the edges. It&rsquos a reminder to me of my chronic and eternal imperfection. Anyway, when you&rsquore through wallowing around in self doubt over the fact that one of your clean pans actually isn&rsquot clean at all, drizzle a little olive oil (1 or 2 tablespoons) in the pan.

Then, just tilt the pan around to coat the bottom thoroughly.

Next, place the garlic heads, cut side up, in the pan. If the heads won&rsquot sit flat on the pan, just give the bottom a little slice to even it out. My bottoms were really flat to begin with, so I didn&rsquot have to do anything. (Note: I did not say MY BOTTOM is flat. It isn&rsquot. Not at all. I wish it were, but it isn&rsquot. And I don&rsquot want to talk about this anymore so please stop bringing it up.)

They look a bit like some bizarre form of sea creature at this point, don&rsquot they? Except they&rsquore not submerged in water. So never mind.

Drizzle the exposed cloves with olive oil. You want them to have a coating of moisture so they won&rsquot burn easily.

Then, sprinkle the cloves with salt. I like Kosher salt, and I keep a little dish of it on my stove at all times.

Here&rsquos my dish of Kosher salt. And it&rsquos on my stove. I told you!

The reason Kosher salt is called Kosher salt, and I&rsquoll count on my Jewish friends among you to correct me if I&rsquom wrong, is not because the salt, in itself, is kosher. It&rsquos that it&rsquos used by butchers to make meats kosher (its flat, flaky quality adheres more readily to the surface of the meat and aids in drawing out the blood.) I love to use it in cooking because it&rsquos easy to grab and sprinkle over foodand it&rsquos easier to control the salt concentration than regular table salt.

Anyway, after you salt the cloves, you&rsquoll want to pepper them, too.

And look! I finally bought myself a new peppermill after my boys commandeered and destroyed my old one last year. Savages.

Now they&rsquore ready to pop in a 375-degree oven.

But first, cover the pan with aluminum foil.

Then place it into the oven for 40 to 45 minutes.

And when you remove it, the garlic will look like this. (Confession: this is actually twenty minutes after I removed it from the oven. I was unavoidably sidetracked. It happens in this godforsaken house of mine.)

But that&rsquos all in the past now. See that delicious, nutty, roasted garlic inside the papery skin? Oh? You can&rsquot see it? Well&helliplet&rsquos take a closer look.

Oh my geez louise great Sister of Perpetual Agony, will you look at that!

Now, all you have to do to extract the roasted cloves is to grab the bottom of the head and gently squeeze until the cloves pop out. They should be quite mushy.

Oh my word. Just come and get me, you hunka hunka burnin&rsquo (roasted) garlic. This, my friends, is what life is really all about.

The applications for using roasted garlic are endless. You can spread some of this buttery, nutty deliciousness on a piece of crusty baguette. Or you can stir it into your favorite pasta dish or soups. Or you can mash it with a little salt and olive oil and spread it on a pizza crust before adding the other ingredients.


How To&hellipRoast Garlic

In this post, I&rsquoll be covering the step of roasting garlic. It&rsquos a very simple skill and I&rsquom sure many of you have down pat, but for those of you who don&rsquot roast garlic on a regular basis, TRUST ME: you&rsquore wandering around in a culinary void. And the only thing in the universe that will fill the void and turn you into the whole, well-rounded person your grandmother intended you to be is roasted garlic. The flavor is&hellipwell, there&rsquos nothing like it on earth.

The first thing you need to do is grab a bunch of heads of garlic. Try not to buy them too small. Then, cut off just enough of the top to expose all of the cloves inside.

Next, find one of your oldest, dearest pie pans. I like this one best, especially because it still has the remnants of an old burned pie along the edges. It&rsquos a reminder to me of my chronic and eternal imperfection. Anyway, when you&rsquore through wallowing around in self doubt over the fact that one of your clean pans actually isn&rsquot clean at all, drizzle a little olive oil (1 or 2 tablespoons) in the pan.

Then, just tilt the pan around to coat the bottom thoroughly.

Next, place the garlic heads, cut side up, in the pan. If the heads won&rsquot sit flat on the pan, just give the bottom a little slice to even it out. My bottoms were really flat to begin with, so I didn&rsquot have to do anything. (Note: I did not say MY BOTTOM is flat. It isn&rsquot. Not at all. I wish it were, but it isn&rsquot. And I don&rsquot want to talk about this anymore so please stop bringing it up.)

They look a bit like some bizarre form of sea creature at this point, don&rsquot they? Except they&rsquore not submerged in water. So never mind.

Drizzle the exposed cloves with olive oil. You want them to have a coating of moisture so they won&rsquot burn easily.

Then, sprinkle the cloves with salt. I like Kosher salt, and I keep a little dish of it on my stove at all times.

Here&rsquos my dish of Kosher salt. And it&rsquos on my stove. I told you!

The reason Kosher salt is called Kosher salt, and I&rsquoll count on my Jewish friends among you to correct me if I&rsquom wrong, is not because the salt, in itself, is kosher. It&rsquos that it&rsquos used by butchers to make meats kosher (its flat, flaky quality adheres more readily to the surface of the meat and aids in drawing out the blood.) I love to use it in cooking because it&rsquos easy to grab and sprinkle over foodand it&rsquos easier to control the salt concentration than regular table salt.

Anyway, after you salt the cloves, you&rsquoll want to pepper them, too.

And look! I finally bought myself a new peppermill after my boys commandeered and destroyed my old one last year. Savages.

Now they&rsquore ready to pop in a 375-degree oven.

But first, cover the pan with aluminum foil.

Then place it into the oven for 40 to 45 minutes.

And when you remove it, the garlic will look like this. (Confession: this is actually twenty minutes after I removed it from the oven. I was unavoidably sidetracked. It happens in this godforsaken house of mine.)

But that&rsquos all in the past now. See that delicious, nutty, roasted garlic inside the papery skin? Oh? You can&rsquot see it? Well&helliplet&rsquos take a closer look.

Oh my geez louise great Sister of Perpetual Agony, will you look at that!

Now, all you have to do to extract the roasted cloves is to grab the bottom of the head and gently squeeze until the cloves pop out. They should be quite mushy.

Oh my word. Just come and get me, you hunka hunka burnin&rsquo (roasted) garlic. This, my friends, is what life is really all about.

The applications for using roasted garlic are endless. You can spread some of this buttery, nutty deliciousness on a piece of crusty baguette. Or you can stir it into your favorite pasta dish or soups. Or you can mash it with a little salt and olive oil and spread it on a pizza crust before adding the other ingredients.


How To&hellipRoast Garlic

In this post, I&rsquoll be covering the step of roasting garlic. It&rsquos a very simple skill and I&rsquom sure many of you have down pat, but for those of you who don&rsquot roast garlic on a regular basis, TRUST ME: you&rsquore wandering around in a culinary void. And the only thing in the universe that will fill the void and turn you into the whole, well-rounded person your grandmother intended you to be is roasted garlic. The flavor is&hellipwell, there&rsquos nothing like it on earth.

The first thing you need to do is grab a bunch of heads of garlic. Try not to buy them too small. Then, cut off just enough of the top to expose all of the cloves inside.

Next, find one of your oldest, dearest pie pans. I like this one best, especially because it still has the remnants of an old burned pie along the edges. It&rsquos a reminder to me of my chronic and eternal imperfection. Anyway, when you&rsquore through wallowing around in self doubt over the fact that one of your clean pans actually isn&rsquot clean at all, drizzle a little olive oil (1 or 2 tablespoons) in the pan.

Then, just tilt the pan around to coat the bottom thoroughly.

Next, place the garlic heads, cut side up, in the pan. If the heads won&rsquot sit flat on the pan, just give the bottom a little slice to even it out. My bottoms were really flat to begin with, so I didn&rsquot have to do anything. (Note: I did not say MY BOTTOM is flat. It isn&rsquot. Not at all. I wish it were, but it isn&rsquot. And I don&rsquot want to talk about this anymore so please stop bringing it up.)

They look a bit like some bizarre form of sea creature at this point, don&rsquot they? Except they&rsquore not submerged in water. So never mind.

Drizzle the exposed cloves with olive oil. You want them to have a coating of moisture so they won&rsquot burn easily.

Then, sprinkle the cloves with salt. I like Kosher salt, and I keep a little dish of it on my stove at all times.

Here&rsquos my dish of Kosher salt. And it&rsquos on my stove. I told you!

The reason Kosher salt is called Kosher salt, and I&rsquoll count on my Jewish friends among you to correct me if I&rsquom wrong, is not because the salt, in itself, is kosher. It&rsquos that it&rsquos used by butchers to make meats kosher (its flat, flaky quality adheres more readily to the surface of the meat and aids in drawing out the blood.) I love to use it in cooking because it&rsquos easy to grab and sprinkle over foodand it&rsquos easier to control the salt concentration than regular table salt.

Anyway, after you salt the cloves, you&rsquoll want to pepper them, too.

And look! I finally bought myself a new peppermill after my boys commandeered and destroyed my old one last year. Savages.

Now they&rsquore ready to pop in a 375-degree oven.

But first, cover the pan with aluminum foil.

Then place it into the oven for 40 to 45 minutes.

And when you remove it, the garlic will look like this. (Confession: this is actually twenty minutes after I removed it from the oven. I was unavoidably sidetracked. It happens in this godforsaken house of mine.)

But that&rsquos all in the past now. See that delicious, nutty, roasted garlic inside the papery skin? Oh? You can&rsquot see it? Well&helliplet&rsquos take a closer look.

Oh my geez louise great Sister of Perpetual Agony, will you look at that!

Now, all you have to do to extract the roasted cloves is to grab the bottom of the head and gently squeeze until the cloves pop out. They should be quite mushy.

Oh my word. Just come and get me, you hunka hunka burnin&rsquo (roasted) garlic. This, my friends, is what life is really all about.

The applications for using roasted garlic are endless. You can spread some of this buttery, nutty deliciousness on a piece of crusty baguette. Or you can stir it into your favorite pasta dish or soups. Or you can mash it with a little salt and olive oil and spread it on a pizza crust before adding the other ingredients.


How To&hellipRoast Garlic

In this post, I&rsquoll be covering the step of roasting garlic. It&rsquos a very simple skill and I&rsquom sure many of you have down pat, but for those of you who don&rsquot roast garlic on a regular basis, TRUST ME: you&rsquore wandering around in a culinary void. And the only thing in the universe that will fill the void and turn you into the whole, well-rounded person your grandmother intended you to be is roasted garlic. The flavor is&hellipwell, there&rsquos nothing like it on earth.

The first thing you need to do is grab a bunch of heads of garlic. Try not to buy them too small. Then, cut off just enough of the top to expose all of the cloves inside.

Next, find one of your oldest, dearest pie pans. I like this one best, especially because it still has the remnants of an old burned pie along the edges. It&rsquos a reminder to me of my chronic and eternal imperfection. Anyway, when you&rsquore through wallowing around in self doubt over the fact that one of your clean pans actually isn&rsquot clean at all, drizzle a little olive oil (1 or 2 tablespoons) in the pan.

Then, just tilt the pan around to coat the bottom thoroughly.

Next, place the garlic heads, cut side up, in the pan. If the heads won&rsquot sit flat on the pan, just give the bottom a little slice to even it out. My bottoms were really flat to begin with, so I didn&rsquot have to do anything. (Note: I did not say MY BOTTOM is flat. It isn&rsquot. Not at all. I wish it were, but it isn&rsquot. And I don&rsquot want to talk about this anymore so please stop bringing it up.)

They look a bit like some bizarre form of sea creature at this point, don&rsquot they? Except they&rsquore not submerged in water. So never mind.

Drizzle the exposed cloves with olive oil. You want them to have a coating of moisture so they won&rsquot burn easily.

Then, sprinkle the cloves with salt. I like Kosher salt, and I keep a little dish of it on my stove at all times.

Here&rsquos my dish of Kosher salt. And it&rsquos on my stove. I told you!

The reason Kosher salt is called Kosher salt, and I&rsquoll count on my Jewish friends among you to correct me if I&rsquom wrong, is not because the salt, in itself, is kosher. It&rsquos that it&rsquos used by butchers to make meats kosher (its flat, flaky quality adheres more readily to the surface of the meat and aids in drawing out the blood.) I love to use it in cooking because it&rsquos easy to grab and sprinkle over foodand it&rsquos easier to control the salt concentration than regular table salt.

Anyway, after you salt the cloves, you&rsquoll want to pepper them, too.

And look! I finally bought myself a new peppermill after my boys commandeered and destroyed my old one last year. Savages.

Now they&rsquore ready to pop in a 375-degree oven.

But first, cover the pan with aluminum foil.

Then place it into the oven for 40 to 45 minutes.

And when you remove it, the garlic will look like this. (Confession: this is actually twenty minutes after I removed it from the oven. I was unavoidably sidetracked. It happens in this godforsaken house of mine.)

But that&rsquos all in the past now. See that delicious, nutty, roasted garlic inside the papery skin? Oh? You can&rsquot see it? Well&helliplet&rsquos take a closer look.

Oh my geez louise great Sister of Perpetual Agony, will you look at that!

Now, all you have to do to extract the roasted cloves is to grab the bottom of the head and gently squeeze until the cloves pop out. They should be quite mushy.

Oh my word. Just come and get me, you hunka hunka burnin&rsquo (roasted) garlic. This, my friends, is what life is really all about.

The applications for using roasted garlic are endless. You can spread some of this buttery, nutty deliciousness on a piece of crusty baguette. Or you can stir it into your favorite pasta dish or soups. Or you can mash it with a little salt and olive oil and spread it on a pizza crust before adding the other ingredients.


How To&hellipRoast Garlic

In this post, I&rsquoll be covering the step of roasting garlic. It&rsquos a very simple skill and I&rsquom sure many of you have down pat, but for those of you who don&rsquot roast garlic on a regular basis, TRUST ME: you&rsquore wandering around in a culinary void. And the only thing in the universe that will fill the void and turn you into the whole, well-rounded person your grandmother intended you to be is roasted garlic. The flavor is&hellipwell, there&rsquos nothing like it on earth.

The first thing you need to do is grab a bunch of heads of garlic. Try not to buy them too small. Then, cut off just enough of the top to expose all of the cloves inside.

Next, find one of your oldest, dearest pie pans. I like this one best, especially because it still has the remnants of an old burned pie along the edges. It&rsquos a reminder to me of my chronic and eternal imperfection. Anyway, when you&rsquore through wallowing around in self doubt over the fact that one of your clean pans actually isn&rsquot clean at all, drizzle a little olive oil (1 or 2 tablespoons) in the pan.

Then, just tilt the pan around to coat the bottom thoroughly.

Next, place the garlic heads, cut side up, in the pan. If the heads won&rsquot sit flat on the pan, just give the bottom a little slice to even it out. My bottoms were really flat to begin with, so I didn&rsquot have to do anything. (Note: I did not say MY BOTTOM is flat. It isn&rsquot. Not at all. I wish it were, but it isn&rsquot. And I don&rsquot want to talk about this anymore so please stop bringing it up.)

They look a bit like some bizarre form of sea creature at this point, don&rsquot they? Except they&rsquore not submerged in water. So never mind.

Drizzle the exposed cloves with olive oil. You want them to have a coating of moisture so they won&rsquot burn easily.

Then, sprinkle the cloves with salt. I like Kosher salt, and I keep a little dish of it on my stove at all times.

Here&rsquos my dish of Kosher salt. And it&rsquos on my stove. I told you!

The reason Kosher salt is called Kosher salt, and I&rsquoll count on my Jewish friends among you to correct me if I&rsquom wrong, is not because the salt, in itself, is kosher. It&rsquos that it&rsquos used by butchers to make meats kosher (its flat, flaky quality adheres more readily to the surface of the meat and aids in drawing out the blood.) I love to use it in cooking because it&rsquos easy to grab and sprinkle over foodand it&rsquos easier to control the salt concentration than regular table salt.

Anyway, after you salt the cloves, you&rsquoll want to pepper them, too.

And look! I finally bought myself a new peppermill after my boys commandeered and destroyed my old one last year. Savages.

Now they&rsquore ready to pop in a 375-degree oven.

But first, cover the pan with aluminum foil.

Then place it into the oven for 40 to 45 minutes.

And when you remove it, the garlic will look like this. (Confession: this is actually twenty minutes after I removed it from the oven. I was unavoidably sidetracked. It happens in this godforsaken house of mine.)

But that&rsquos all in the past now. See that delicious, nutty, roasted garlic inside the papery skin? Oh? You can&rsquot see it? Well&helliplet&rsquos take a closer look.

Oh my geez louise great Sister of Perpetual Agony, will you look at that!

Now, all you have to do to extract the roasted cloves is to grab the bottom of the head and gently squeeze until the cloves pop out. They should be quite mushy.

Oh my word. Just come and get me, you hunka hunka burnin&rsquo (roasted) garlic. This, my friends, is what life is really all about.

The applications for using roasted garlic are endless. You can spread some of this buttery, nutty deliciousness on a piece of crusty baguette. Or you can stir it into your favorite pasta dish or soups. Or you can mash it with a little salt and olive oil and spread it on a pizza crust before adding the other ingredients.


How To&hellipRoast Garlic

In this post, I&rsquoll be covering the step of roasting garlic. It&rsquos a very simple skill and I&rsquom sure many of you have down pat, but for those of you who don&rsquot roast garlic on a regular basis, TRUST ME: you&rsquore wandering around in a culinary void. And the only thing in the universe that will fill the void and turn you into the whole, well-rounded person your grandmother intended you to be is roasted garlic. The flavor is&hellipwell, there&rsquos nothing like it on earth.

The first thing you need to do is grab a bunch of heads of garlic. Try not to buy them too small. Then, cut off just enough of the top to expose all of the cloves inside.

Next, find one of your oldest, dearest pie pans. I like this one best, especially because it still has the remnants of an old burned pie along the edges. It&rsquos a reminder to me of my chronic and eternal imperfection. Anyway, when you&rsquore through wallowing around in self doubt over the fact that one of your clean pans actually isn&rsquot clean at all, drizzle a little olive oil (1 or 2 tablespoons) in the pan.

Then, just tilt the pan around to coat the bottom thoroughly.

Next, place the garlic heads, cut side up, in the pan. If the heads won&rsquot sit flat on the pan, just give the bottom a little slice to even it out. My bottoms were really flat to begin with, so I didn&rsquot have to do anything. (Note: I did not say MY BOTTOM is flat. It isn&rsquot. Not at all. I wish it were, but it isn&rsquot. And I don&rsquot want to talk about this anymore so please stop bringing it up.)

They look a bit like some bizarre form of sea creature at this point, don&rsquot they? Except they&rsquore not submerged in water. So never mind.

Drizzle the exposed cloves with olive oil. You want them to have a coating of moisture so they won&rsquot burn easily.

Then, sprinkle the cloves with salt. I like Kosher salt, and I keep a little dish of it on my stove at all times.

Here&rsquos my dish of Kosher salt. And it&rsquos on my stove. I told you!

The reason Kosher salt is called Kosher salt, and I&rsquoll count on my Jewish friends among you to correct me if I&rsquom wrong, is not because the salt, in itself, is kosher. It&rsquos that it&rsquos used by butchers to make meats kosher (its flat, flaky quality adheres more readily to the surface of the meat and aids in drawing out the blood.) I love to use it in cooking because it&rsquos easy to grab and sprinkle over foodand it&rsquos easier to control the salt concentration than regular table salt.

Anyway, after you salt the cloves, you&rsquoll want to pepper them, too.

And look! I finally bought myself a new peppermill after my boys commandeered and destroyed my old one last year. Savages.

Now they&rsquore ready to pop in a 375-degree oven.

But first, cover the pan with aluminum foil.

Then place it into the oven for 40 to 45 minutes.

And when you remove it, the garlic will look like this. (Confession: this is actually twenty minutes after I removed it from the oven. I was unavoidably sidetracked. It happens in this godforsaken house of mine.)

But that&rsquos all in the past now. See that delicious, nutty, roasted garlic inside the papery skin? Oh? You can&rsquot see it? Well&helliplet&rsquos take a closer look.

Oh my geez louise great Sister of Perpetual Agony, will you look at that!

Now, all you have to do to extract the roasted cloves is to grab the bottom of the head and gently squeeze until the cloves pop out. They should be quite mushy.

Oh my word. Just come and get me, you hunka hunka burnin&rsquo (roasted) garlic. This, my friends, is what life is really all about.

The applications for using roasted garlic are endless. You can spread some of this buttery, nutty deliciousness on a piece of crusty baguette. Or you can stir it into your favorite pasta dish or soups. Or you can mash it with a little salt and olive oil and spread it on a pizza crust before adding the other ingredients.


How To&hellipRoast Garlic

In this post, I&rsquoll be covering the step of roasting garlic. It&rsquos a very simple skill and I&rsquom sure many of you have down pat, but for those of you who don&rsquot roast garlic on a regular basis, TRUST ME: you&rsquore wandering around in a culinary void. And the only thing in the universe that will fill the void and turn you into the whole, well-rounded person your grandmother intended you to be is roasted garlic. The flavor is&hellipwell, there&rsquos nothing like it on earth.

The first thing you need to do is grab a bunch of heads of garlic. Try not to buy them too small. Then, cut off just enough of the top to expose all of the cloves inside.

Next, find one of your oldest, dearest pie pans. I like this one best, especially because it still has the remnants of an old burned pie along the edges. It&rsquos a reminder to me of my chronic and eternal imperfection. Anyway, when you&rsquore through wallowing around in self doubt over the fact that one of your clean pans actually isn&rsquot clean at all, drizzle a little olive oil (1 or 2 tablespoons) in the pan.

Then, just tilt the pan around to coat the bottom thoroughly.

Next, place the garlic heads, cut side up, in the pan. If the heads won&rsquot sit flat on the pan, just give the bottom a little slice to even it out. My bottoms were really flat to begin with, so I didn&rsquot have to do anything. (Note: I did not say MY BOTTOM is flat. It isn&rsquot. Not at all. I wish it were, but it isn&rsquot. And I don&rsquot want to talk about this anymore so please stop bringing it up.)

They look a bit like some bizarre form of sea creature at this point, don&rsquot they? Except they&rsquore not submerged in water. So never mind.

Drizzle the exposed cloves with olive oil. You want them to have a coating of moisture so they won&rsquot burn easily.

Then, sprinkle the cloves with salt. I like Kosher salt, and I keep a little dish of it on my stove at all times.

Here&rsquos my dish of Kosher salt. And it&rsquos on my stove. I told you!

The reason Kosher salt is called Kosher salt, and I&rsquoll count on my Jewish friends among you to correct me if I&rsquom wrong, is not because the salt, in itself, is kosher. It&rsquos that it&rsquos used by butchers to make meats kosher (its flat, flaky quality adheres more readily to the surface of the meat and aids in drawing out the blood.) I love to use it in cooking because it&rsquos easy to grab and sprinkle over foodand it&rsquos easier to control the salt concentration than regular table salt.

Anyway, after you salt the cloves, you&rsquoll want to pepper them, too.

And look! I finally bought myself a new peppermill after my boys commandeered and destroyed my old one last year. Savages.

Now they&rsquore ready to pop in a 375-degree oven.

But first, cover the pan with aluminum foil.

Then place it into the oven for 40 to 45 minutes.

And when you remove it, the garlic will look like this. (Confession: this is actually twenty minutes after I removed it from the oven. I was unavoidably sidetracked. It happens in this godforsaken house of mine.)

But that&rsquos all in the past now. See that delicious, nutty, roasted garlic inside the papery skin? Oh? You can&rsquot see it? Well&helliplet&rsquos take a closer look.

Oh my geez louise great Sister of Perpetual Agony, will you look at that!

Now, all you have to do to extract the roasted cloves is to grab the bottom of the head and gently squeeze until the cloves pop out. They should be quite mushy.

Oh my word. Just come and get me, you hunka hunka burnin&rsquo (roasted) garlic. This, my friends, is what life is really all about.

The applications for using roasted garlic are endless. You can spread some of this buttery, nutty deliciousness on a piece of crusty baguette. Or you can stir it into your favorite pasta dish or soups. Or you can mash it with a little salt and olive oil and spread it on a pizza crust before adding the other ingredients.


How To&hellipRoast Garlic

In this post, I&rsquoll be covering the step of roasting garlic. It&rsquos a very simple skill and I&rsquom sure many of you have down pat, but for those of you who don&rsquot roast garlic on a regular basis, TRUST ME: you&rsquore wandering around in a culinary void. And the only thing in the universe that will fill the void and turn you into the whole, well-rounded person your grandmother intended you to be is roasted garlic. The flavor is&hellipwell, there&rsquos nothing like it on earth.

The first thing you need to do is grab a bunch of heads of garlic. Try not to buy them too small. Then, cut off just enough of the top to expose all of the cloves inside.

Next, find one of your oldest, dearest pie pans. I like this one best, especially because it still has the remnants of an old burned pie along the edges. It&rsquos a reminder to me of my chronic and eternal imperfection. Anyway, when you&rsquore through wallowing around in self doubt over the fact that one of your clean pans actually isn&rsquot clean at all, drizzle a little olive oil (1 or 2 tablespoons) in the pan.

Then, just tilt the pan around to coat the bottom thoroughly.

Next, place the garlic heads, cut side up, in the pan. If the heads won&rsquot sit flat on the pan, just give the bottom a little slice to even it out. My bottoms were really flat to begin with, so I didn&rsquot have to do anything. (Note: I did not say MY BOTTOM is flat. It isn&rsquot. Not at all. I wish it were, but it isn&rsquot. And I don&rsquot want to talk about this anymore so please stop bringing it up.)

They look a bit like some bizarre form of sea creature at this point, don&rsquot they? Except they&rsquore not submerged in water. So never mind.

Drizzle the exposed cloves with olive oil. You want them to have a coating of moisture so they won&rsquot burn easily.

Then, sprinkle the cloves with salt. I like Kosher salt, and I keep a little dish of it on my stove at all times.

Here&rsquos my dish of Kosher salt. And it&rsquos on my stove. I told you!

The reason Kosher salt is called Kosher salt, and I&rsquoll count on my Jewish friends among you to correct me if I&rsquom wrong, is not because the salt, in itself, is kosher. It&rsquos that it&rsquos used by butchers to make meats kosher (its flat, flaky quality adheres more readily to the surface of the meat and aids in drawing out the blood.) I love to use it in cooking because it&rsquos easy to grab and sprinkle over foodand it&rsquos easier to control the salt concentration than regular table salt.

Anyway, after you salt the cloves, you&rsquoll want to pepper them, too.

And look! I finally bought myself a new peppermill after my boys commandeered and destroyed my old one last year. Savages.

Now they&rsquore ready to pop in a 375-degree oven.

But first, cover the pan with aluminum foil.

Then place it into the oven for 40 to 45 minutes.

And when you remove it, the garlic will look like this. (Confession: this is actually twenty minutes after I removed it from the oven. I was unavoidably sidetracked. It happens in this godforsaken house of mine.)

But that&rsquos all in the past now. See that delicious, nutty, roasted garlic inside the papery skin? Oh? You can&rsquot see it? Well&helliplet&rsquos take a closer look.

Oh my geez louise great Sister of Perpetual Agony, will you look at that!

Now, all you have to do to extract the roasted cloves is to grab the bottom of the head and gently squeeze until the cloves pop out. They should be quite mushy.

Oh my word. Just come and get me, you hunka hunka burnin&rsquo (roasted) garlic. This, my friends, is what life is really all about.

The applications for using roasted garlic are endless. You can spread some of this buttery, nutty deliciousness on a piece of crusty baguette. Or you can stir it into your favorite pasta dish or soups. Or you can mash it with a little salt and olive oil and spread it on a pizza crust before adding the other ingredients.


How To&hellipRoast Garlic

In this post, I&rsquoll be covering the step of roasting garlic. It&rsquos a very simple skill and I&rsquom sure many of you have down pat, but for those of you who don&rsquot roast garlic on a regular basis, TRUST ME: you&rsquore wandering around in a culinary void. And the only thing in the universe that will fill the void and turn you into the whole, well-rounded person your grandmother intended you to be is roasted garlic. The flavor is&hellipwell, there&rsquos nothing like it on earth.

The first thing you need to do is grab a bunch of heads of garlic. Try not to buy them too small. Then, cut off just enough of the top to expose all of the cloves inside.

Next, find one of your oldest, dearest pie pans. I like this one best, especially because it still has the remnants of an old burned pie along the edges. It&rsquos a reminder to me of my chronic and eternal imperfection. Anyway, when you&rsquore through wallowing around in self doubt over the fact that one of your clean pans actually isn&rsquot clean at all, drizzle a little olive oil (1 or 2 tablespoons) in the pan.

Then, just tilt the pan around to coat the bottom thoroughly.

Next, place the garlic heads, cut side up, in the pan. If the heads won&rsquot sit flat on the pan, just give the bottom a little slice to even it out. My bottoms were really flat to begin with, so I didn&rsquot have to do anything. (Note: I did not say MY BOTTOM is flat. It isn&rsquot. Not at all. I wish it were, but it isn&rsquot. And I don&rsquot want to talk about this anymore so please stop bringing it up.)

They look a bit like some bizarre form of sea creature at this point, don&rsquot they? Except they&rsquore not submerged in water. So never mind.

Drizzle the exposed cloves with olive oil. You want them to have a coating of moisture so they won&rsquot burn easily.

Then, sprinkle the cloves with salt. I like Kosher salt, and I keep a little dish of it on my stove at all times.

Here&rsquos my dish of Kosher salt. And it&rsquos on my stove. I told you!

The reason Kosher salt is called Kosher salt, and I&rsquoll count on my Jewish friends among you to correct me if I&rsquom wrong, is not because the salt, in itself, is kosher. It&rsquos that it&rsquos used by butchers to make meats kosher (its flat, flaky quality adheres more readily to the surface of the meat and aids in drawing out the blood.) I love to use it in cooking because it&rsquos easy to grab and sprinkle over foodand it&rsquos easier to control the salt concentration than regular table salt.

Anyway, after you salt the cloves, you&rsquoll want to pepper them, too.

And look! I finally bought myself a new peppermill after my boys commandeered and destroyed my old one last year. Savages.

Now they&rsquore ready to pop in a 375-degree oven.

But first, cover the pan with aluminum foil.

Then place it into the oven for 40 to 45 minutes.

And when you remove it, the garlic will look like this. (Confession: this is actually twenty minutes after I removed it from the oven. I was unavoidably sidetracked. It happens in this godforsaken house of mine.)

But that&rsquos all in the past now. See that delicious, nutty, roasted garlic inside the papery skin? Oh? You can&rsquot see it? Well&helliplet&rsquos take a closer look.

Oh my geez louise great Sister of Perpetual Agony, will you look at that!

Now, all you have to do to extract the roasted cloves is to grab the bottom of the head and gently squeeze until the cloves pop out. They should be quite mushy.

Oh my word. Just come and get me, you hunka hunka burnin&rsquo (roasted) garlic. This, my friends, is what life is really all about.

The applications for using roasted garlic are endless. You can spread some of this buttery, nutty deliciousness on a piece of crusty baguette. Or you can stir it into your favorite pasta dish or soups. Or you can mash it with a little salt and olive oil and spread it on a pizza crust before adding the other ingredients.


How To&hellipRoast Garlic

In this post, I&rsquoll be covering the step of roasting garlic. It&rsquos a very simple skill and I&rsquom sure many of you have down pat, but for those of you who don&rsquot roast garlic on a regular basis, TRUST ME: you&rsquore wandering around in a culinary void. And the only thing in the universe that will fill the void and turn you into the whole, well-rounded person your grandmother intended you to be is roasted garlic. The flavor is&hellipwell, there&rsquos nothing like it on earth.

The first thing you need to do is grab a bunch of heads of garlic. Try not to buy them too small. Then, cut off just enough of the top to expose all of the cloves inside.

Next, find one of your oldest, dearest pie pans. I like this one best, especially because it still has the remnants of an old burned pie along the edges. It&rsquos a reminder to me of my chronic and eternal imperfection. Anyway, when you&rsquore through wallowing around in self doubt over the fact that one of your clean pans actually isn&rsquot clean at all, drizzle a little olive oil (1 or 2 tablespoons) in the pan.

Then, just tilt the pan around to coat the bottom thoroughly.

Next, place the garlic heads, cut side up, in the pan. If the heads won&rsquot sit flat on the pan, just give the bottom a little slice to even it out. My bottoms were really flat to begin with, so I didn&rsquot have to do anything. (Note: I did not say MY BOTTOM is flat. It isn&rsquot. Not at all. I wish it were, but it isn&rsquot. And I don&rsquot want to talk about this anymore so please stop bringing it up.)

They look a bit like some bizarre form of sea creature at this point, don&rsquot they? Except they&rsquore not submerged in water. So never mind.

Drizzle the exposed cloves with olive oil. You want them to have a coating of moisture so they won&rsquot burn easily.

Then, sprinkle the cloves with salt. I like Kosher salt, and I keep a little dish of it on my stove at all times.

Here&rsquos my dish of Kosher salt. And it&rsquos on my stove. I told you!

The reason Kosher salt is called Kosher salt, and I&rsquoll count on my Jewish friends among you to correct me if I&rsquom wrong, is not because the salt, in itself, is kosher. It&rsquos that it&rsquos used by butchers to make meats kosher (its flat, flaky quality adheres more readily to the surface of the meat and aids in drawing out the blood.) I love to use it in cooking because it&rsquos easy to grab and sprinkle over foodand it&rsquos easier to control the salt concentration than regular table salt.

Anyway, after you salt the cloves, you&rsquoll want to pepper them, too.

And look! I finally bought myself a new peppermill after my boys commandeered and destroyed my old one last year. Savages.

Now they&rsquore ready to pop in a 375-degree oven.

But first, cover the pan with aluminum foil.

Then place it into the oven for 40 to 45 minutes.

And when you remove it, the garlic will look like this. (Confession: this is actually twenty minutes after I removed it from the oven. I was unavoidably sidetracked. It happens in this godforsaken house of mine.)

But that&rsquos all in the past now. See that delicious, nutty, roasted garlic inside the papery skin? Oh? You can&rsquot see it? Well&helliplet&rsquos take a closer look.

Oh my geez louise great Sister of Perpetual Agony, will you look at that!

Now, all you have to do to extract the roasted cloves is to grab the bottom of the head and gently squeeze until the cloves pop out. They should be quite mushy.

Oh my word. Just come and get me, you hunka hunka burnin&rsquo (roasted) garlic. This, my friends, is what life is really all about.

The applications for using roasted garlic are endless. You can spread some of this buttery, nutty deliciousness on a piece of crusty baguette. Or you can stir it into your favorite pasta dish or soups. Or you can mash it with a little salt and olive oil and spread it on a pizza crust before adding the other ingredients.